MS Series Encoder Datasheet by Linx Technologies Inc.

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Lir'i)'(' TECHNOLOGIES Wireless made simple®
MS Series
Remote Control Encoder
Data Guide
Warning: Some customers may want Linx radio frequency (“RF”)
products to control machinery or devices remotely, including machinery
or devices that can cause death, bodily injuries, and/or property
damage if improperly or inadvertently triggered, particularly in industrial
settings or other applications implicating life-safety concerns (“Life and
Property Safety Situations”).
NO OEM LINX REMOTE CONTROL OR FUNCTION MODULE
SHOULD EVER BE USED IN LIFE AND PROPERTY SAFETY
SITUATIONS. No OEM Linx Remote Control or Function Module
should be modified for Life and Property Safety Situations. Such
modification cannot provide sufficient safety and will void the product’s
regulatory certification and warranty.
Customers may use our (non-Function) Modules, Antenna and
Connectors as part of other systems in Life Safety Situations, but
only with necessary and industry appropriate redundancies and
in compliance with applicable safety standards, including without
limitation, ANSI and NFPA standards. It is solely the responsibility of any
Linx customer who uses one or more of these products to incorporate
appropriate redundancies and safety standards for the Life and
Property Safety Situation application.
Do not use this or any Linx product to trigger an action directly
from the data line or RSSI lines without a protocol or encoder/
decoder to validate the data. Without validation, any signal from
another unrelated transmitter in the environment received by the module
could inadvertently trigger the action.
All RF products are susceptible to RF interference that can prevent
communication. RF products without frequency agility or hopping
implemented are more subject to interference. This module does not
have a frequency hopping protocol built in.
Do not use any Linx product over the limits in this data guide.
Excessive voltage or extended operation at the maximum voltage could
cause product failure. Exceeding the reflow temperature profile could
cause product failure which is not immediately evident.
Do not make any physical or electrical modifications to any Linx
product. This will void the warranty and regulatory and UL certifications
and may cause product failure which is not immediately evident.
!Table of Contents
1 Description
1 Features
1 Applications
2 Ordering Information
2 Absolute Maximum Ratings
2 Timings
3 Electrical Specifications
4 Pin Assignments
6 Design Considerations
7 A Practical Example
8 Baud Rate Selection
9 Encoder Operation
9 SEND Mode
10 Create Mode
12 Typical Applications
13 System Example
14 Recommended Pad Layout
14 Production Considerations
15 Resources
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1
Description
MS Series encoders and decoders are designed
for remote control applications. They allow the
status of up to eight buttons or contacts to be
securely transferred via a wireless link. The large
twenty-four bit address size makes transmissions
highly unique, minimizing the possibility of
multiple devices having conflicting addresses.
The MS Series decoder allows the recognition
of individual output lines to be easily defined
for each transmitter by the manufacturer or the
user. This enables the creation of unique user
groups and relationships. The decoder also
identifies and outputs the originating encoder
ID for logging or identification. Housed in a tiny
20-pin SSOP package, MS Series encoders feature low supply voltage and
current consumption. Selectable baud rates and latched or momentary
outputs make the MS Series truly versatile.
Features
• Secure 224 possible addresses
• 8 data lines
• Low 2.0 to 5.5V operating
voltage
• Low supply current (370µA @ 3V)
• Ultra-low 0.1µA standby current
• Definable recognition authority
• True serial encoding
• Excellent noise immunity
• Selectable baud rates
• No programmer required
• Direct serial interface
• Small SMD package
• Latched or momentary outputs
• Encoder ID output by decoder
Applications
• Keyless entry
• Door and gate openers
• Security systems
• Remote device control
• Car alarms / starters
• Home / industrial automation
• Remote status monitoring
• Lighting control
MS Series Remote Control Encoder
Data Guide
Revised 3/18/2015
0.030
(0.75)
0.007
(0.18)
0.013
(0.32)
0.026
(0.65)
0.309
(7.85)
0.207 (5.25)
0.284
(7.20)
LICAL-ENC-MS001
YYWWNNN
Figure 1: Package Dimensions
– –
2 32 3
Ordering Information
Encoder SEND to Decoder Activation Times (ms)
Baud Rate Initial Start-Up After Valid Rx With RX_PDN
(Worst Case)
2,400 72.62 38.62 600 + 72.62
9,600 22.42 12.42 300 + 22.42
19,200 13.80 7.30 150 + 13.80
28,800 11.00 6.00 150 + 11.00
Timings
Ordering Information
Part Number Description
LICAL-ENC-MS001 MS Encoder
LICAL-DEC-MS001 MS Decoder
MDEV-LICAL-MS MS Master Development System
MS encoders are shipped in reels of 1,600
Absolute Maximum Ratings
Figure 2: Ordering Information
Figure 3: Absolute Maximum Ratings
Absolute Maximum Ratings
Supply Voltage VCC −0.3 to +6.5 VDC
Any Input or Output Pin −0.3 to VCC + 0.3 VDC
Max. Current Sourced by Output Pins 25 mA
Max. Current Sunk by Input Pins 25 mA
Max. Current Into VCC 250 mA
Max. Current Out Of GND 300 mA
Operating Temperature −40 to +85 ºC
Storage Temperature −65 to +150 ºC
Exceeding any of the limits of this section may lead to permanent damage to the device.
Furthermore, extended operation at these maximum ratings may reduce the life of this
device.
Figure 4: Encoder SEND to Decoder Activation Times (ms)
MS Series Enccoder Specifications
Parameter Symbol Min. Typ. Max. Units Notes
Power Supply
Operating Voltage VCC 2.0 5.5 VDC
Supply Current lCC
At 2.0V VCC 240 300 µA 1
At 3.0V VCC 370 470 µA 1
At 5.0V VCC 670 780 µA 1
Power Down Current lPDN
At 2.0V VCC 0.10 0.80 µA
At 3.0V VCC 0.10 0.85 µA
At 5.0V VCC 0.20 0.95 µA
Encoder Section
Input Low VIL 0.0 0.15 x VCC V 2
Input High VIH 0.8 x VCC VCC V 3
Output Low VOL 0.6 V
Output High VOH VCC – 0.7 V
Input Sink Current 25 mA
Output Drive Current 25 mA
SEND High to DATA_OUT 1.64 ms
Environmental
Operating Temperature
Range –40 +85 °C
1. Current consumption with no active loads.
2. For 3V supply, (0.15 x 3.0) = 0.45V max.
3. For 3V supply, (0.8 x 3.0) = 2.4V min.
Electrical Specifications
Figure 5: Electrical Specifications
Warning: This product incorporates numerous static-sensitive
components. Always wear an ESD wrist strap and observe proper ESD
handling procedures when working with this device. Failure to observe
this precaution may result in module damage or failure.
\8|w|w|~lmlml>\wl~ld D6 LlCAL»ENC-MSOO1 D5 D4— D7 SEL_BAU D0 SEL_BAU D1 GND GND GND TX_CNTL DATA_OUT MODE_IN D D3 D2 VCC VCC D1 D0 SEND CREATE_ADDR _. _. _. _. _. _. _. .. m lmlmlblmlmlu‘m «ale
– –
4 5
Pin Assignments
Figure 6: MS Series Encoder Pin Assignments
10 MODE_IND O
Mode Indicator Output. This line
is activated while the encoder
is in Create Mode, allowing the
connection of an LED. The line is
high for the entire time the encoder
is in Create Mode, indicating that it
is creating a new Address.
11 CREATE_ADDR I
Create Mode Selection Line. When
this line is taken high, the encoder
enters Create Mode and randomly
generates a new Address. The
Address continuously randomized
while this line is high, and is saved
as soon as the line is taken low.
12 SEND I
Encoder Send Data Line. When
this line goes high, the encoder
records the states of the data
lines, retrieves the Address from
memory, assemble sthe packet,
and outputs it as a serial bit stream
on the DATA_OUT line at the baud
rate selected by the states of the
SEL_BAUD lines.
15, 16 VCC Supply Voltage
None of the input lines have internal pull-up or pull-down resistors. The input lines must
always be in a known state (either GND or VCC) at all times or the operation may not
be predictable. The designer must ensure that the input lines are never floating, either
by using external resistors, by tying the lines directly to GND or VCC, or by use of other
circuits to control the line state.
Pin Descriptions
Pin Number Name I/O Description
1, 2, 13, 14, 17–20 DO–D7 I
Data Input Lines. The state of
these lines are captured when
the SEND line goes high and
encoded for transmission. Upon
successful reception, these states
are reproduced on the outputs of
the decoder.
3 SEL_BAUD0 I
Baud Rate Selection Line 0. This
line along with SEL_BAUD1 sets
the baud rate of the serial data
stream to one of 4 possible rates.
The rate must be set before power
on.
4 SEL_BAUD1 I
Baud Rate Selection Line 1. This
line along with SEL_BAUD0 sets
the baud rate of the serial data
stream to one of 4 possible rates.
The rate must be set before power
on.
5, 6, 7 GND Ground
8 TX_CNTL 0
External Transmitter Control Line.
This line goes high when the SEND
line goes high, and low when the
SEND line goes low. This can be
used to power up an external
RF or infrared transmitter when
the encoder is sending data, and
power it down when the encoder
is asleep. It can also be used to
drive a LED for visual transmit
indication.
9 DATA_OUT 0
Serial Data Output. The encoder
outputs a serial data stream on this
line. This line can directly interface
with all Linx RF transmitter
modules.
Figure 7: Pin Descriptions
LICAL-ENC-MS001
D
6
D7
SEL
_
BAUD
0
SEL
_
BAUD
1
N
N
N
TX
_
CNT
L
DATA
_
OU
T
MODE
_
IN
D
D
5
D4
D
3
D2
V
CC
V
CC
D1
D
0
S
EN
D
CREATE
_
ADD
R
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
0
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
– –
6 7
Design Considerations
The Linx MS Series encoders and decoders are designed for remote
control applications. They provide an easy way to securely register button
presses or switch closures over a wireless link. The encoder side turns the
status of eight parallel input lines into a secure, encoded, serial bit-stream
output intended for transmission via an RF or infrared link. Once received,
the decoder decodes, error checks, and analyzes the transmission. If the
transmission is authenticated, the output lines are set to replicate the status
of the lines on the encoder.
Prior to the arrival of the Linx MS Series, encoders and decoders typically
fell into one of two categories. First were older generation, low-security
devices that transmitted a fixed address code, usually set manually with a
DIP switch. These address lines frequently caused the user confusion when
trying to match a transmitter to a receiver. Another disadvantage was the
possibility that address information could be captured and later used to
compromise the system.
These concerns resulted in the development of a second type of encoder
/ decoder that focused on security and utilized encryption to guard
against code cracking or code grabbing. Typically, the encoding of each
transmission changes based on complex mathematical algorithms to
prevent someone from replicating a transmission. These devices gained
rapid popularity due to their high security and the elimination of manual
switches; however, they imposed some limitations of their own. Such
devices typically offer a limited number of inputs, the transmitter and
receiver can become desynchronized, and creating relationships and
associations between groups of transmitters and receivers is difficult.
The Linx product line, which includes the MS and HS Series, is the first
product line to offer the best of all worlds. Both series accept up to eight
inputs, allowing a large number of buttons or contacts to be connected.
The devices also allow relationships among multiple encoders and
decoders to be easily created. Security is well provided for. The MS Series
uses a random fixed word with 224 possible combinations to give a high
level of uniqueness and a reasonable level of security. For applications
requiring the highest security, the HS Series, which employs tri-level,
maximum-security encryption, should be considered.
Encoder transmission protocol and methodology is a critical but often
overlooked factor in range and noise immunity. The MS and HS products
utilize a true serial data stream rather than the PWM schemes employed
by many competitive devices. This allows products based on MS or HS
devices to achieve superior range and immunity from interference, edge
jitter, and other adverse external influences.
One of the most important features unique to the MS and HS products
is their ability to establish a unique user identity and profile for the device
containing the encoder. In conventional designs, all encoded transmissions
are either recognized or denied based on the address. In cases where
encoder and decoder addresses match, the state of all data lines is
recognized and output. Linx products uniquely allow a user or manufacturer
to define which encoder inputs are acknowledged by each decoder. MS
series decoders can store up to 40 system users and unique profiles for
each. This allows for an incredible variety of unique relationships among
multiple system components and opens the door to product features not
previously possible.
A Practical Example
Consider this practical example: a three door garage houses Dad’s
Corvette, Mom’s Mercedes and Son’s Yugo. With most competitive
products, any user’s keyfob could open any garage door as long as the
addresses match. In a Linx MS-based system, the keyfobs could easily
be configured to open only certain doors (guess which one Son gets to
open!) The MS Series also allows for component grouping. Imagine a
remote control designed for use in a woodshop. One button could turn
on a vacuum, one an air cleaner, and another a light, yet another button
could then be user configured to turn on all of them with a single touch.
The MS Series uniquely combines security and simplicity with the power
to create groups and relationships. Figure 8 compares the advantages and
disadvantages of different encoders.
– –
8 9
Encoder Comparison Table
Manual Address Encoders
Advantages
High number of button inputs
Disadvantages
Low-security fixed code
Confusing manual addressing
Low number of addresses
PWM data output
High security vulnerabilities
"Rolling Code" Encoders
Advantages
Highly secure
Eliminates manual address settings
Disadvantages
Low number of button inputs
Encoder and decoder can become unsynchronized
Difficult or impossible to create relationships
Security vulnerabilities
Linx Encoders
Advantages
High number of button inputs
Highly unique (MS)
Highest security available on the market (HS)
Eliminates manual address settings
Allows for associative relationships
Cannot unsynchronize
Serial data output
Encoder ID is output by the decoder
Latched or momentary outputs (MS)
External transmitter and receiver control lines
Disadvantages
Slightly higher cost for some basic applications
Security vulnerabilities (MS only)
Figure 8: Encoder Comparison Table
Baud Rate Selection
SEL_BAUD0 and SEL_BAUD1 are used to select the baud rate of the
serial data stream. The state of the lines allows the selection of one of four
possible baud rates, as shown in Figure 9.
The baud rate must be set before power up. The encoder will not recognize
a change in the baud rate setting after it is on.
Baud Rate Selection Table
SEL_BAUD1 SEL_BAUD0 Baud Rate (bps)
0 0 2,400
0 1 9,600
1 0 19,200
1 1 28,800
Figure 9: Baud Rate Selection Table
Encoder Operation
Upon power up, the encoder sets the baud rate based on the state of the
SEL_BAUD lines and then checks the SEND line. If it is high, the encoder
enters Send Mode. Otherwise, it pulls the TX_CTNL line low and goes into
low-power sleep mode. It remains asleep until either the CREATE_ADDR or
SEND lines goes high. These lines place the encoder in either Create Mode
or Send Mode as described in the following sections.
SEND Mode
When the SEND line goes high the encoder enters Send Mode. The
encoder pulls the TX_CNTL line high to activate the transmitter, records the
states of the data lines, assembles the packet, and sends it through the
DATA_OUT line. It continues doing this for as long as the SEND line is high,
updating the state of the data lines with each transmission. Once SEND is
pulled low, the encoder finishes the current transmission, pulls TX_CNTL
low to deactivate the transmitter, and goes to sleep.
For simple applications that require only a single input, SEND can be tied
directly to the data input line, allowing a single connection. If additional lines
are used in this manner, diodes or dual contact switches are necessary
to prevent voltage on one data line from activating all of the data lines.
The Typlical Application section demonstrates the use of diodes for this
purpose.
– –
10 11
Create Mode
The Create Mode allows the generation of a unique address to ensure the
security of transmission and prevent unintentional operation of devices. The
MS encoder allows 16,777,216 (224 ) possible addresses. Each encoder is
shipped with a unique address that is set at the factory. If a new Address is
desired, creating it is remarkably straightforward.
When the CREATE_ADDR line is pulled high, the encoder randomizes the
Address continuously until the CREATE_ADDR line is pulled low. Once
the encoder registers the low line, the Address is saved and the encoder
begins to toggle the MODE_IND line. This indicates to the user that the
encoder is ready to accept the Control Permissions.
Control Permissions are set by activating the data lines that the encoder
is to have the authority to operate. Each desired data line is activated
individually or simultaneously, in any order. Pulling the CREATE_ADDR line
high again or waiting for a 15-second timeout to expire causes the encoder
to save the Control Permissions and go back to sleep.
The Address is sent with every transmission when the SEND line is pulled
high, but the encoder can only activate the decoder data lines that are
authorized by the Control Permissions.
The Address is learned by an MS Series decoder by placing the decoder
into Learn Mode and sending a transmission from the encoder. Please refer
to the MS Series Decoder Data Guide for full details.
The CREATE_ADDR line can be tied to a button or contact point accessible
by the user. With a simple press, the user generates a unique address that
should never again require changing. Some designers may prefer to set an
Address during production and not provide for change by the user.
The MODE_IND line allows for the connection of an LED or other device to
indicate to the user that the encoder is in Create Mode. Once the CREATE_
ADDR line goes high and the encoder enters Create Mode, the MODE_IND
line goes high and stays high until the CREATE_ADDR line goes low. The
MODE_IND line is capable of sourcing up to 25mA of current.
Power Up
NO
NO
YES
YES
Pull The TX_CNTL
Line Low
Set Baud Rate
NO
YES
Sleep
Get the Data From
the Data Lines
Send the Data
Packet
Pull The TX_CNTL
Line High
NO
YES
Pull MODE_IND
Line High
Randomize
Address
Pull MODE_IND
Line Low
Save Address
Start Toggling
MODE_IND
Save Control
Permissions
Pull MODE_IND
Line Low
YES
YES
NO
NO
Poll Data Lines &
Update Control
Permissions
Compare With
Control
Permissions
Is the
SEND Line High?
Is the
CREATE_ ADDR
Line High?
Is the
SEND Line High?
Is the
CREATE_ADDR
Line High?
Time Out?
Is the
CREATE_ADDR
Line High?
Figure 10: MS Series Encoder Flowchart
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– –
12 13
Typical Applications
The MS encoder is ideal for registering button presses in remote control
applications. An example application circuit is shown in Figure 11.
In this circuit, SPDT switches are used to select the baud rate so that
pull-down resistors are not needed. The data lines are connected to
buttons and when any button is pressed, the SEND line is pulled high and
causes the encoder to transmit. The diodes are used to prevent the voltage
on one data line from appearing on another data line.
If only one data line is needed, then it can be tied directly to the SEND line
without the need for the diodes.
None of the inputs have pull-up or pull-down resistors internally, so 100kΩ
pull-down resistors are used on the data lines, SEND, and CREATE_ADDR.
These resistors are used to pull the lines to ground when the buttons are
not being pressed and ensure that they are always in a known state and
not floating. Without these resistors, the state of the lines could not be
guaranteed and encoder operation may not be predictable.
An LED is attached to the MODE_IND line to provide visual feedback to
the user that an operation is taking place. This line sources a maximum of
25mA.
Outgoing encoded data is sent out of the DATA_OUT line at the baud rate
determined by the state of the SEL_BAUD lines. This line can be connected
directly to the DATA_IN line of a Linx transmitter, used to modulate an
infrared diode, or connected to any other serial transmission medium.
T
o
Tr
a
n
s
mitt
e
r
100k
100k
22
0
100k
100k
100k
100k
100k
100k
100k
LICAL-ENC-MS001
D
6
D7
SEL
_
BAUD
0
SEL
_
BAUD
1
G
N
D
G
N
D
G
N
D
TX
_
CNT
L
DATA
_
OU
T
MODE
_
IN
D
D
5
D4
D
3
D2
V
CC
V
CC
D1
D
0
S
EN
D
CREATE
_
ADD
R
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
0
11
12
1
3
14
1
5
1
6
17
1
8
1
9
2
0
220
To Tr
a
n
s
mitt
e
r PD
N
100k
Figure 11: MS Series Encoder Application Circuit
The TX_CNTL line is connected to the PDN line of a Linx transmitter. This
is used to place the transmitter into a low power state when not in use. An
LED can also be connected to the TX_CNTL line to provide visual indication
that the encoder is sending data.
In this example, the data lines are pulled high by simple pushbutton
switches, but many other methods may be employed. Trace contacts,
reed switches or microcontrollers are just some examples of other ways of
pulling the data lines high. The flexibility of the encoder combined with the
associative options of the matching decoder opens a whole new world of
options for creative designers.
System Example
The first step in using the encoder is to set the baud rate using the SPDT
switches or simply tying the lines to supply or ground. Next, a unique
Address is created by pressing and holding the button connected to the
CREATE_ADDR line for as long as desired. While the button is held, the
LED is on indicating that the Address is being created. Once the button is
released, the LED starts flashing. The data buttons that the encoder is to
access are now pressed. Pressing the CREATE_ADDR button again makes
the encoder save the new Address and Control Permissions, turn off the
LED, and go to sleep.
The decoder must now learn the Address for the system to be operational.
Please see the decoder data guide for instructions on how to do this. The
MS Series Master Development System implements this system, so please
see the User’s Guide for more system information and circuit schematics.
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– –
14 15
Recommended Pad Layout
The MS Series encoders and decoders are implemented in an industry
standard 20-pin Shrink Small Outline Package (20-SSOP). The
recommended layout dimensions are shown in Figure 12.
Production Considerations
These surface-mount components are designed to comply with standard
reflow production methods. The recommended reflow profile is shown in
Figure 13 and should not be exceeded, as permanent damage to the part
may result.
0.047
(1.19)
0.016
(0.41)
0.026
(0.65)
0.328 (8.33)
0.234 (5.94)
Figure 12: PCB Layout Dimensions
240°C Max
0
25
50
75
100
125
150
175
200
225
250
TEMPERATURE (°C)
275
020406080 100 120 140 160 180 200 220 240 260 280 300 320
TIME (SECONDS)
340 360 380 420400
260°C Max
Lead-Free
Sn / Pb
Figure 13: MS Series Reflow Profile
Resources
Support
For technical support, product documentation, application notes, regulatory
guidelines and software updates, visit www.linxtechnologies.com
RF Design Services
For customers who need help implementing Linx modules, Linx offers
design services including board layout assistance, programming,
certification advice and packaging design. For more complex RF solutions,
Apex Wireless, a division of Linx Technologies, creates optimized designs
with RF components and firmware selected for the customer’s application.
Call +1 800 736 6677 (+1 541 471 6256 if outside the United States) for
more information.
Antenna Factor Antennas
Linx’s Antenna Factor division has the
industry’s broadest selection of antennas
for a wide variety of applications. For
customers with specialized needs, custom antennas and design services
are available along with simulations of antenna performance to speed
development. Learn more at www.linxtechnologies.com.
by
Lir'ix TECHNOLOGIES
Disclaimer
Linx Technologies is continually striving to improve the quality and function of its products. For this reason, we
reserve the right to make changes to our products without notice. The information contained in this Data Guide
is believed to be accurate as of the time of publication. Specifications are based on representative lot samples.
Values may vary from lot-to-lot and are not guaranteed. “Typical” parameters can and do vary over lots and
application. Linx Technologies makes no guarantee, warranty, or representation regarding the suitability of any
product for use in any specific application. It is the customer’s responsibility to verify the suitability of the part for
the intended application. NO LINX PRODUCT IS INTENDED FOR USE IN ANY APPLICATION WHERE THE SAFETY
OF LIFE OR PROPERTY IS AT RISK.
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©2015 Linx Technologies. All rights reserved.
The stylized Linx logo, Wireless Made Simple, WiSE, CipherLinx and the stylized CL logo are trademarks of Linx Technologies.
Linx Technologies
159 Ort Lane
Merlin, OR, US 97532
Phone: +1 541 471 6256
Fax: +1 541 471 6251
www.linxtechnologies.com

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