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MAX V Device Handbook
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MAX V Device Handbook
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
© 2017 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, HARDCOPY, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX are Reg. U.S. Pat.
& Tm. Off. and/or trademarks of Altera Corporation in the U.S. and other countries. All other trademarks and service marks are the property of their respective
holders as described at www.altera.com/common/legal.html. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance
with Altera’s standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or
liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera
customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or
services.
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Contents
Section I. MAX V Device Core
Chapter 1. MAX V Device Family Overview
Feature Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–1
Integrated Software Platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–3
Device Pin-Outs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–3
Ordering Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–4
Document Revision History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1–4
Chapter 2. MAX V Architecture
Functional Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–1
Logic Array Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–4
LAB Interconnects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–6
LAB Control Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–6
Logic Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–8
LUT Chain and Register Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–9
addnsub Signal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–9
LE Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–9
Normal Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–10
Dynamic Arithmetic Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–10
Carry-Select Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–11
Clear and Preset Logic Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–13
LE RAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–13
MultiTrack Interconnect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–14
Global Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–19
User Flash Memory Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–21
UFM Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–22
Internal Oscillator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–22
Program, Erase, and Busy Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–23
Auto-Increment Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–23
Serial Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–23
UFM Block to Logic Array Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–24
Core Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–25
I/O Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–26
Fast I/O Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–27
I/O Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–28
I/O Standards and Banks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–29
PCI Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–32
LVDS and RSDS Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–32
Schmitt Trigger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–32
Output Enable Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–33
Programmable Drive Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–33
Slew-Rate Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–34
Open-Drain Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–34
Programmable Ground Pins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–34
Bus-Hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–34
Programmable Pull-Up Resistor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–35
Programmable Input Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–35
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MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
MultiVolt I/O Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–35
Document Revision History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2–36
Chapter 3. DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Operating Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–1
Absolute Maximum Ratings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–1
Recommended Operating Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–2
Programming/Erasure Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–3
DC Electrical Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–3
Output Drive Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–5
I/O Standard Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–5
Bus Hold Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–8
Power-Up Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–9
Power Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–10
Timing Model and Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–10
Preliminary and Final Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–11
Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–11
Internal Timing Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–12
External Timing Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–19
External Timing I/O Delay Adders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–23
Maximum Input and Output Clock Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–26
LVDS and RSDS Output Timing Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–27
JTAG Timing Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–29
Document Revision History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3–30
Section II. System Integration in MAX V Devices
Chapter 4. Hot Socketing and Power-On Reset in MAX V Devices
MAX V Hot-Socketing Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–1
Devices Can Be Driven Before Power Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–2
I/O Pins Remain Tri-Stated During Power Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–2
Signal Pins Do Not Drive the VCCIO or VCCINT Power Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–2
AC and DC Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–2
Hot-Socketing Feature Implementation in MAX V Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–3
Power-On Reset Circuitry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–5
Power-Up Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–5
Document Revision History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4–6
Chapter 5. Using MAX V Devices in Multi-Voltage Systems
I/O Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–1
MultiVolt I/O Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–3
5.0-V Device Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–3
Recommended Operating Conditions for 5.0-V Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–7
Power-Up Sequencing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–8
Document Revision History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–8
Chapter 6. JTAG and In-System Programmability in MAX V Devices
IEEE Std. 1149.1 Boundary-Scan Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–1
JTAG Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–4
Parallel Flash Loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–4
In-System Programmability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–5
IEEE 1532 Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–6
Jam Standard Test and Programming Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
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June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Programming Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–6
User Flash Memory Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–7
In-System Programming Clamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–7
Real-Time ISP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–8
Design Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–8
Programming with External Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–8
Document Revision History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6–9
Chapter 7. User Flash Memory in MAX V Devices
UFM Array Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–1
Memory Organization Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–2
Using and Accessing UFM Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–2
UFM Functional Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–3
UFM Address Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–5
UFM Data Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–6
UFM Program/Erase Control Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–6
Oscillator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–7
Instantiating the Oscillator without the UFM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–7
UFM Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–8
Read/Stream Read . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–9
Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–10
Erase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–11
Programming and Reading the UFM with JTAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–12
Jam Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–12
Jam Players . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–12
Software Support for UFM Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–13
Inter-Integrated Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–13
I2C Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–13
Device Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–15
Byte Write Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–16
Page Write Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–17
Acknowledge Polling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–17
Write Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–17
Erase Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–17
Read Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–20
ALTUFM_I2C Interface Timing Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–22
Instantiating the I2C Interface Using the Quartus II ALTUFM_I2C Megafunction . . . . . . . . . . . 7–23
Serial Peripheral Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–23
Opcodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–25
ALTUFM SPI Timing Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–35
Instantiating SPI Using Quartus II ALTUFM_SPI Megafunction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–35
Parallel Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–36
ALTUFM Parallel Interface Timing Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–37
Instantiating Parallel Interface Using Quartus II ALTUFM_PARALLEL Megafunction . . . . . . 7–37
None (Altera Serial Interface) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–38
Instantiating None Using Quartus II ALTUFM_NONE Megafunction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–38
Creating Memory Content File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–39
Memory Initialization for the ALTUFM_PARALLEL Megafunction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–39
Memory Initialization for the ALTUFM_SPI Megafunction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–39
Memory Initialization for the ALTUFM_I2C Megafunction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–40
Simulation Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–43
Document Revision History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7–43
vi Contents
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
Chapter 8. JTAG Boundary-Scan Testing in MAX V Devices
IEEE Std. 1149.1 BST Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–2
IEEE Std. 1149.1 Boundary-Scan Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–3
Boundary-Scan Cells of a MAX V Device I/O Pin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–4
JTAG Pins and Power Pins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–5
IEEE Std. 1149.1 BST Operation Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–6
SAMPLE/PRELOAD Instruction Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–8
EXTEST Instruction Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–10
BYPASS Instruction Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–12
IDCODE Instruction Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–12
USERCODE Instruction Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–13
CLAMP Instruction Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–13
HIGHZ Instruction Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–13
I/O Voltage Support in the JTAG Chain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–13
Boundary-Scan Test for Programmed Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–14
Disabling IEEE Std. 1149.1 BST Circuitry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–15
Guidelines for IEEE Std. 1149.1 Boundary-Scan Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–15
Boundary-Scan Description Language Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–15
Document Revision History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8–16
Additional Information
Document Revision History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Info–1
How to Contact Altera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Info–1
Typographic Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Info–1
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Section I. MAX V Device Core
This section provides a complete overview of all features relating to the MAX®V
device family.
This section includes the following chapters:
Chapter 1, MAX V Device Family Overview
Chapter 2, MAX V Architecture
Chapter 3, DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
I–2 Section I: MAX V Device Core
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
MAX V Device Handbook
May 2011
MV51001-1.2
Subscribe
© 2011 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, HARDCOPY, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX are Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off.
and/or trademarks of Altera Corporation in the U.S. and other countries. All other trademarks and service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at
www.altera.com/common/legal.html. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera’s standard warranty, but
reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any
information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device
specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.
1. MAX V Device Family Overview
The MAX®V family of low cost and low power CPLDs offer more density and I/Os
per footprint versus other CPLDs. Ranging in density from 40 to 2,210 logic elements
(LEs) (32 to 1,700 equivalent macrocells) and up to 271 I/Os, MAX V devices provide
programmable solutions for applications such as I/O expansion, bus and protocol
bridging, power monitoring and control, FPGA configuration, and analog IC
interface.
MAX V devices feature on-chip flash storage, internal oscillator, and memory
functionality. With up to 50% lower total power versus other CPLDs and requiring as
few as one power supply, MAX V CPLDs can help you meet your low power design
requirement.
This chapter contains the following sections:
“Feature Summary” on page 1–1
“Integrated Software Platform” on page 1–3
“Device Pin-Outs” on page 1–3
“Ordering Information” on page 1–4
Feature Summary
The following list summarizes the MAX V device family features:
Low-cost, low-power, and non-volatile CPLD architecture
Instant-on (0.5 ms or less) configuration time
Standby current as low as 25 µA and fast power-down/reset operation
Fast propagation delay and clock-to-output times
Internal oscillator
Emulated RSDS output support with a data rate of up to 200 Mbps
Emulated LVDS output support with a data rate of up to 304 Mbps
Four global clocks with two clocks available per logic array block (LAB)
User flash memory block up to 8 Kbits for non-volatile storage with up to 1000
read/write cycles
Single 1.8-V external supply for device core
MultiVolt I/O interface supporting 3.3-V, 2.5-V, 1.8-V, 1.5-V, and 1.2-V logic levels
Bus-friendly architecture including programmable slew rate, drive strength,
bus-hold, and programmable pull-up resistors
Schmitt triggers enabling noise tolerant inputs (programmable per pin)
1–2 Chapter 1: MAX V Device Family Overview
Feature Summary
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
I/Os are fully compliant with the PCI-SIG® PCI Local Bus Specification, revision
2.2 for 3.3-V operation
Hot-socket compliant
Built-in JTAG BST circuitry compliant with IEEE Std. 1149.1-1990
Table 1–1 lists the MAX V family features.
MAX V devices accept 1.8 V on their
VCCINT
pins. The 1.8-V VCCINT external supply
powers the device core directly. MAX V devices operate internally at 1.8 V. The
supported MultiVolt I/O interface voltage levels (VCCIO) are 1.2V, 1.5V, 1.8V, 2.5V,
and 3.3 V.
MAX V devices are available in two speed grades: –4 and –5, with –4 being the fastest.
For commercial applications, speed grades –C4 and –C5 are available. For industrial
and automotive applications, speed grade –I5 and –A5 are available, respectively.
These speed grades represent the overall relative performance, not any specific timing
parameter.
fFor propagation delay timing numbers within each speed grade and density, refer to
the DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices chapter.
MAX V devices are available in space-saving FineLine BGA (FBGA), Micro FineLine
BGA (MBGA), plastic enhanced quad flat pack (EQFP), and thin quad flat pack
(TQFP) packages (refer to Table 1–2 and Table 1–3). MAX V devices support vertical
migration within the same package (for example, you can migrate between the
5M570Z, 5M1270Z, and 5M2210Z devices in the 256-pin FineLine BGA package).
Vertical migration means that you can migrate to devices whose dedicated pins and
JTAG pins are the same and power pins are subsets or supersets for a given package
across device densities. The largest density in any package has the highest number of
power pins; you must lay out for the largest planned density in a package to provide
Table 1–1. MAX V Family Features
Feature 5M40Z 5M80Z 5M160Z 5M240Z 5M570Z 5M1270Z 5M2210Z
LEs 40 80 160 240 570 1,270 2,210
Typical Equivalent Macrocells 32 64 128 192 440 980 1,700
User Flash Memory Size (bits) 8,192 8,192 8,192 8,192 8,192 8,192 8,192
Global Clocks 4444444
Internal Oscillator 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Maximum User I/O pins 54 79 79 114 159 271 271
tPD1 (ns) (1) 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 9.0 6.2 7.0
fCNT (MHz) (2) 152 152 152 152 152 304 304
tSU (ns) 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.2 1.2 1.2
tCO (ns) 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.5 6.7 4.6 4.6
Notes to Table 1–1:
(1) tPD1 represents a pin-to-pin delay for the worst case I/O placement with a full diagonal path across the device and combinational logic
implemented in a single LUT and LAB that is adjacent to the output pin.
(2) The maximum global clock frequency, fCNT, is limited by the I/O standard on the clock input pin. The 16-bit counter critical delay will run faster
than this number.
Chapter 1: MAX V Device Family Overview 1–3
Integrated Software Platform
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
the necessary power pins for migration. For I/O pin migration across densities, cross
reference the available I/O pins using the device pin-outs for all planned densities of
a given package type to identify which I/O pins can be migrated. The Quartus® II
software can automatically cross-reference and place all pins for you when given a
device migration list.
Integrated Software Platform
The Quartus II software provides an integrated environment for HDL and schematic
design entry, compilation and logic synthesis, full simulation and advanced timing
analysis, and programming of MAX V devices.
fFor more information about the Quartus II software features, refer to the Quartus II
Handbook.
You can debug your MAX V designs using In-System Sources and Probes Editor in
the Quartus II software. This feature allows you to easily control any internal signal
and provides you with a completely dynamic debugging environment.
fFor more information about the In-System Sources and Probes Editor, refer to the
Design Debugging Using In-System Sources and Probes chapter of the Quartus II
Handbook.
Device Pin-Outs
fFor more information, refer to the MAX V Device Pin-Out Files page.
Table 1–2. MAX V Packages and User I/O Pins (Note 1)
Device 64-Pin
MBGA
64-Pin
EQFP
68-Pin
MBGA
100-Pin
TQFP
100-Pin
MBGA
144-Pin
TQFP
256-Pin
FBGA
324-Pin
FBGA
5M40Z 30 54 — — — —
5M80Z 30 54 52 79 — — —
5M160Z 54 52 79 79 — —
5M240Z 52 79 79 114 —
5M570Z 74 74 114 159
5M1270Z 114 211 271
5M2210Z — — — 203 271
Note to Table 1–2:
(1) Device packages under the same arrow sign have vertical migration capability.
Table 1–3. MAX V Package Sizes
Package 64-Pin
MBGA
64-Pin
EQFP
68-Pin
MBGA
100-Pin
TQFP
100-Pin
MBGA
144-Pin
TQFP
256-Pin
FBGA
324-Pin
FBGA
Pitch (mm) 0.5 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 1 1
Area (mm2) 20.25 81 25 256 36 484 289 361
Length × width
(mm × mm) 4.5 × 4.5 9 × 9 5 × 5 16 × 16 6 × 6 22 × 22 17 × 17 19 × 19
1–4 Chapter 1: MAX V Device Family Overview
Ordering Information
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
Ordering Information
Figure 1–1 shows the ordering codes for MAX V devices.
Document Revision History
Table 1–4 lists the revision history for this chapter.
Figure 1–1. MAX V Device Packaging Ordering Information
Package Type
T: Thin quad flat pack (TQFP)
F: FineLine BGA (FBGA)
M: Micro FineLine BGA (MBGA)
E: Plastic Enhanced Quad Flat Pack (EQFP)
Speed Grade
Family Signature
5M: MAX V
Operating Temperature
Pin Count
Device Type
40Z: 40 Logic Elements
80Z: 80 Logic Elements
160Z: 160 Logic Elements
240Z: 240 Logic Elements
570Z: 570 Logic Elements
1270Z: 1,270 Logic Elements
2210Z: 2,210 Logic Elements
Optional Suffix
4 or 5, with 4 being the fastest
Number of pins for a particular package
C: Commercial temperature (T
J
= 0
°
C to 85
°
C)
I: Industrial temperature (T
J
= -40
°
C to 100
°
C)
A: Automotive temperature (T
J
= -40
°
C to 125
°
C)
5M 40Z E 64 C 4 N
Indicates specific device
options or shipment method
N: Lead-free packaging
Table 1–4. Document Revision History
Date Version Changes
May 2011 1.2
Updated Figure 1–1.
Updated Table 1–3.
January 2011 1.1 Updated “Feature Summary” section.
December 2010 1.0 Initial release.
MAX V Device Handbook
December 2010
MV51002-1.0
Subscribe
© 2010 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, HARDCOPY, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX are Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off.
and/or trademarks of Altera Corporation in the U.S. and other countries. All other trademarks and service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at
www.altera.com/common/legal.html. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera’s standard warranty, but
reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any
information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device
specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.
2. MAX V Architecture
This chapter describes the architecture of the MAX® V device and contains the
following sections:
“Functional Description” on page 2–1
“Logic Array Blocks” on page 2–4
“Logic Elements” on page 2–8
“MultiTrack Interconnect” on page 2–14
“Global Signals” on page 2–19
“User Flash Memory Block” on page 2–21
“Internal Oscillator” on page 2–22
“Core Voltage” on page 2–25
“I/O Structure” on page 2–26
Functional Description
MAX V devices contain a two-dimensional row- and column-based architecture to
implement custom logic. Row and column interconnects provide signal interconnects
between the logic array blocks (LABs).
Each LAB in the logic array contains 10 logic elements (LEs). An LE is a small unit of
logic that provides efficient implementation of user logic functions. LABs are grouped
into rows and columns across the device. The MultiTrack interconnect provides fast
granular timing delays between LABs. The fast routing between LEs provides
minimum timing delay for added levels of logic versus globally routed interconnect
structures.
The I/O elements (IOEs) located after the LAB rows and columns around the
periphery of the MAX V device feeds the I/O pins. Each IOE contains a bidirectional
I/O buffer with several advanced features. I/O pins support Schmitt trigger inputs
and various single-ended standards, such as 33-MHz, 32-bit PCI™, and LVTTL.
MAX V devices provide a global clock network. The global clock network consists of
four global clock lines that drive throughout the entire device, providing clocks for all
resources within the device. You can also use the global clock lines for control signals
such as clear, preset, or output enable.
2–2 Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture
Functional Description
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
Figure 2–1 shows a functional block diagram of the MAX V device.
Each MAX V device contains a flash memory block within its floorplan. This block is
located on the left side of the 5M40Z, 5M80Z, 5M160Z, and 5M240Z devices. On the
5M240Z (T144 package), 5M570Z, 5M1270Z, and 5M2210Z devices, the flash memory
block is located on the bottom-left area of the device. The majority of this flash
memory storage is partitioned as the dedicated configuration flash memory (CFM)
block. The CFM block provides the non-volatile storage for all of the SRAM
configuration information. The CFM automatically downloads and configures the
logic and I/O at power-up, providing instant-on operation.
fFor more information about configuration upon power-up, refer to the Hot Socketing
and Power-On Reset for MAX V Devices chapter.
A portion of the flash memory within the MAX V device is partitioned into a small
block for user data. This user flash memory (UFM) block provides 8,192 bits of
general-purpose user storage. The UFM provides programmable port connections to
the logic array for reading and writing. There are three LAB rows adjacent to this
block, with column numbers varying by device.
Figure 2–1. Device Block Diagram
Logic Array
BLock (LAB
)
MultiTrack
Interconnect
MultiTrack
Interconnect
Logic
Element
Logic
Element
IOE
IOE
IOE IOE
Logic
Element
Logic
Element
IOE
IOE
Logic
Element
Logic
Element
IOE IOE
Logic
Element
Logic
Element
Logic
Element
Logic
Element
IOE IOE
Logic
Element
Logic
Element
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–3
Functional Description
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Table 2–1 lists the number of LAB rows and columns in each device, as well as the
number of LAB rows and columns adjacent to the flash memory area. The long LAB
rows are full LAB rows that extend from one side of row I/O blocks to the other. The
short LAB rows are adjacent to the UFM block; their length is shown as width in LAB
columns.
Table 2–1. Device Resources for MAX V Devices
Device UFM Blocks LAB Columns
LAB Rows
Total LABs
Long LAB Rows Short LAB Rows (Width) (1)
5M40Z 1 6 4 24
5M80Z 1 6 4 24
5M160Z 1 6 4 24
5M240Z (2) 164 — 24
5M240Z (3) 1124 3 (3) 57
5M570Z 1 12 4 3 (3) 57
5M1270Z (4) 1 16 7 3 (5) 127
5M1270Z (5) 1 20 10 3 (7) 221
5M2210Z 1 20 10 3 (7) 221
Notes to Table 2–1:
(1) The width is the number of LAB columns in length.
(2) Not applicable to T144 package of the 5M240Z device.
(3) Only applicable to T144 package of the 5M240Z device.
(4) Not applicable to F324 package of the 5M1270Z device.
(5) Only applicable to F324 package of the 5M1270Z device.
2–4 Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture
Logic Array Blocks
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
Figure 2–2 shows a floorplan of a MAX V device.
Logic Array Blocks
Each LAB consists of 10 LEs, LE carry chains, LAB control signals, a local interconnect,
a look-up table (LUT) chain, and register chain connection lines. There are 26 possible
unique inputs into an LAB, with an additional 10 local feedback input lines fed by LE
outputs in the same LAB. The local interconnect transfers signals between LEs in the
same LAB. LUT chain connections transfer the LUT output from one LE to the
Figure 2–2. Device Floorplan for MAX V Devices (Note 1)
Note to Figure 2–2:
(1) The device shown is a 5M570Z device. 5M1270Z and 5M2210Z devices have a similar floorplan with more LABs. For 5M40Z, 5M80Z, 5M160Z,
and 5M240Z devices, the CFM and UFM blocks are located on the left side of the device.
UFM Block
CFM Block
I/O Blocks
Logic Array
Blocks
I/O Blocks
Logic Array
Blocks
2 GCLK
Inputs
2 GCLK
Inputs
I/O Blocks
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Logic Array Blocks
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
adjacent LE for fast sequential LUT connections within the same LAB. Register chain
connections transfer the output of one LE’s register to the adjacent LE’s register
within an LAB. The Quartus® II software places associated logic within an LAB or
adjacent LABs, allowing the use of local, LUT chain, and register chain connections
for performance and area efficiency. Figure 2–3 shows the MAX V LAB.
Figure 2–3. LAB Structure for MAX V Devices
Note to Figure 2–3:
(1) Only from LABs adjacent to IOEs.
DirectLink
interconnect from
adjacent LAB
or IOE
DirectLink
interconnect to
adjacent LAB
or IOE
Row Interconnect
Column Interconnect
Local InterconnectLAB
DirectLink
interconnect from
adjacent LAB
or IOE
DirectLink
interconnect to
adjacent LAB
or IOE
Fast I/O connection
to IOE (1)
Fast I/O connection
to IOE (1)
LE0
LE1
LE2
LE3
LE4
LE6
LE7
LE8
LE9
LE5
Logic Element
2–6 Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture
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LAB Interconnects
Column and row interconnects and LE outputs within the same LAB drive the LAB
local interconnect. Adjacent LABs, from the left and right, can also drive an LAB’s
local interconnect through the DirectLink connection. The DirectLink connection
feature minimizes the use of row and column interconnects, providing higher
performance and flexibility. Each LE can drive 30 other LEs through fast local and
DirectLink interconnects. Figure 2–4 shows the DirectLink connection.
LAB Control Signals
Each LAB contains dedicated logic for driving control signals to its LEs. The control
signals include two clocks, two clock enables, two asynchronous clears, a
synchronous clear, an asynchronous preset/load, a synchronous load, and
add/subtract control signals, providing a maximum of 10 control signals at a time.
Synchronous load and clear signals are generally used when implementing counters
but they can also be used with other functions.
Each LAB can use two clocks and two clock enable signals. Each LAB’s clock and
clock enable signals are linked. For example, any LE in a particular LAB using the
labclk1
signal also uses
labclkena1
. If the LAB uses both the rising and falling edges
of a clock, it also uses both LAB-wide clock signals. Deasserting the clock enable
signal turns off the LAB-wide clock.
Each LAB can use two asynchronous clear signals and an asynchronous load/preset
signal. By default, the Quartus II software uses a
NOT
gate push-back technique to
achieve preset. If you disable the
NOT
gate push-back option or assign a given register
to power-up high using the Quartus II software, the preset is then achieved using the
asynchronous load signal with asynchronous load data input tied high.
Figure 2–4. DirectLink Connection
LAB
DirectLink
interconnect
to right
DirectLink interconnect from
right LAB or IOE output
DirectLink interconnect from
left LAB or IOE output
Local
Interconnect
DirectLink
interconnect
to left
LE0
LE1
LE2
LE3
LE4
LE6
LE7
LE8
LE9
LE5
Logic Element
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–7
Logic Array Blocks
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
With the LAB-wide
addnsub
control signal, a single LE can implement a one-bit adder
and subtractor. This signal saves LE resources and improves performance for logic
functions such as correlators and signed multipliers that alternate between addition
and subtraction depending on data.
The LAB column clocks
[3..0]
, driven by the global clock network, and LAB local
interconnect generate the LAB-wide control signals. The MultiTrack interconnect
structure drives the LAB local interconnect for non-global control signal generation.
The MultiTrack interconnect’s inherent low skew allows clock and control signal
distribution in addition to data signals. Figure 2–5 shows the LAB control signal
generation circuit.
Figure 2–5. LAB-Wide Control Signals
labclkena1
labclk2labclk1
labclkena2
asyncload
or labpre
syncload
Dedicated
LAB Column
Clocks
Local
Interconnect
Local
Interconnect
Local
Interconnect
Local
Interconnect
Local
Interconnect
Local
Interconnect labclr1
labclr2
synclr
addnsub
4
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MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
Logic Elements
The smallest unit of logic in the MAX V architecture, the LE, is compact and provides
advanced features with efficient logic utilization. Each LE contains a four-input LUT,
which is a function generator that can implement any function of four variables. In
addition, each LE contains a programmable register and carry chain with carry-select
capability. A single LE also supports dynamic single-bit addition or subtraction mode
that is selected by an LAB-wide control signal. Each LE drives all types of
interconnects: local, row, column, LUT chain, register chain, and DirectLink
interconnects as shown in Figure 2–6.
You can configure each LE’s programmable register for D, T, JK, or SR operation. Each
register has data, true asynchronous load data, clock, clock enable, clear, and
asynchronous load/preset inputs. Global signals, general purpose I/O (GPIO) pins,
or any LE can drive the register’s clock and clear control signals. Either GPIO pins or
LEs can drive the clock enable, preset, asynchronous load, and asynchronous data.
The asynchronous load data input comes from the
data3
input of the LE. For
combinational functions, the LUT output bypasses the register and drives directly to
the LE outputs.
Each LE has three outputs that drive the local, row, and column routing resources. The
LUT or register output can drive these three outputs independently. Two LE outputs
drive either a column or row and DirectLink routing connections while one output
drives the local interconnect resources. This configuration allows the LUT to drive one
output while the register drives another output. This register packing feature
Figure 2–6. LE for MAX V Devices
labclk1
labclk2
labclr2
labpre/aload
Carry-In1
Carry-In0
LAB Carry-In
Clock and
Clock Enable
Select
LAB Carry-Out
Carry-Out1
Carry-Out0
Look-Up
Ta b l e
(LUT)
Carry
Chain
Row, column,
and DirectLink
routing
Row, column,
and DirectLink
routing
Programmable
Register
PRN/ALD
CLRN
DQ
ENA
Register Bypass
Packed
Register Select
Chip-Wide
Reset (DEV_CLRn)
labclkena1
labclkena2
Synchronous
Load and
Clear Logic
LAB-wide
Synchronous
Load LAB-wide
Synchronous
Clear
Asynchronous
Clear/Preset/
Load Logic
data1
data2
data3
data4
LUT chain
routing to next LE
labclr1
Local routing
Register chain
output
ADATA
addnsub
Register
Feedback
Register chain
routing from
previous LE
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–9
Logic Elements
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
improves device utilization because the device can use the register and the LUT for
unrelated functions. Another special packing mode allows the register output to feed
back into the LUT of the same LE so that the register is packed with its own fan-out
LUT. This mode provides another mechanism for improved fitting. The LE can also
drive out registered and unregistered versions of the LUT output.
LUT Chain and Register Chain
In addition to the three general routing outputs, the LEs within a LAB have LUT chain
and register chain outputs. LUT chain connections allow LUTs within the same LAB
to cascade together for wide input functions. Register chain outputs allow registers
within the same LAB to cascade together. The register chain output allows a LAB to
use LUTs for a single combinational function and the registers for an unrelated shift
register implementation. These resources speed up connections between LABs while
saving local interconnect resources. For more information about LUT chain and
register chain connections, refer to “MultiTrack Interconnect” on page 2–14.
addnsub Signal
The LE’s dynamic adder/subtractor feature saves logic resources by using one set of
LEs to implement both an adder and a subtractor. This feature is controlled by the
LAB-wide control signal
addnsub
. The
addnsub
signal sets the LAB to perform either
A + B or A – B. The LUT computes addition; subtraction is computed by adding the
two’s complement of the intended subtractor. The LAB-wide signal converts to two’s
complement by inverting the B bits within the LAB and setting carry-in to 1, which
adds one to the LSB. The LSB of an adder/subtractor must be placed in the first LE of
the LAB, where the LAB-wide
addnsub
signal automatically sets the carry-in to 1. The
Quartus II Compiler automatically places and uses the adder/subtractor feature
when using adder/subtractor parameterized functions.
LE Operating Modes
The MAX V LE can operate in one of the following modes:
“Normal Mode”
“Dynamic Arithmetic Mode”
Each mode uses LE resources differently. In each mode, eight available inputs to the
LE, the four data inputs from the LAB local interconnect,
carry-in0
and
carry-in1
from the previous LE, the LAB carry-in from the previous carry-chain LAB, and the
register chain connection are directed to different destinations to implement the
desired logic function. LAB-wide signals provide clock, asynchronous clear,
asynchronous preset/load, synchronous clear, synchronous load, and clock enable
control for the register. These LAB-wide signals are available in all LE modes. The
addnsub
control signal is allowed in arithmetic mode.
The Quartus II software, along with parameterized functions such as the library of
parameterized modules (LPM) functions, automatically chooses the appropriate
mode for common functions such as counters, adders, subtractors, and arithmetic
functions.
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Logic Elements
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
Normal Mode
The normal mode is suitable for general logic applications and combinational
functions. In normal mode, four data inputs from the LAB local interconnect are
inputs to a four-input LUT as shown in Figure 2–7. The Quartus II Compiler
automatically selects the carry-in or the
data3
signal as one of the inputs to the LUT.
Each LE can use LUT chain connections to drive its combinational output directly to
the next LE in the LAB. Asynchronous load data for the register comes from the
data3
input of the LE. LEs in normal mode support packed registers.
Dynamic Arithmetic Mode
The dynamic arithmetic mode is ideal for implementing adders, counters,
accumulators, wide parity functions, and comparators. A LE in dynamic arithmetic
mode uses four 2-input LUTs configurable as a dynamic adder/subtractor. The first
two 2-input LUTs compute two summations based on a possible carry-in of 1 or 0; the
other two LUTs generate carry outputs for the two chains of the carry-select circuitry.
As shown in Figure 2–8, the LAB carry-in signal selects either the
carry-in0
or
carry-in1
chain. The selected chain’s logic level in turn determines which parallel
sum is generated as a combinational or registered output. For example, when
implementing an adder, the sum output is the selection of two possible calculated
sums:
data1 + data2 + carry-in0
or
data1 + data2 + carry-in1
Figure 2–7. LE in Normal Mode
Note to Figure 2–7:
(1) This signal is only allowed in normal mode if the LE is after an adder/subtractor chain.
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–11
Logic Elements
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
The other two LUTs use the
data1
and
data2
signals to generate two possible
carry-out signals: one for a carry of 1 and the other for a carry of 0. The
carry-in0
signal acts as the carry-select for the
carry-out0
output and
carry-in1
acts as the
carry-select for the
carry-out1
output. LEs in arithmetic mode can drive out
registered and unregistered versions of the LUT output.
The dynamic arithmetic mode also offers clock enable, counter enable, synchronous
up/down control, synchronous clear, synchronous load, and dynamic
adder/subtractor options. The LAB local interconnect data inputs generate the
counter enable and synchronous up/down control signals. The synchronous clear
and synchronous load options are LAB-wide signals that affect all registers in the
LAB. The Quartus II software automatically places any registers that are not used by
the counter into other LABs. The
addnsub
LAB-wide signal controls whether the LE
acts as an adder or subtractor.
Carry-Select Chain
The carry-select chain provides a very fast carry-select function between LEs in
dynamic arithmetic mode. The carry-select chain uses the redundant carry calculation
to increase the speed of carry functions. The LE is configured to calculate outputs for a
possible carry-in of 0 and carry-in of 1 in parallel. The
carry-in0
and
carry-in1
signals from a lower-order bit feed forward into the higher-order bit via the parallel
carry chain and feed into both the LUT and the next portion of the carry chain.
Carry-select chains can begin in any LE within an LAB.
Figure 2–8. LE in Dynamic Arithmetic Mode
Note to Figure 2–8:
(1) The addnsub signal is tied to the carry input for the first LE of a carry chain only.
data1 LUT
data2
data3
addnsub
(LAB Wide)
clock (LAB Wide)
ena (LAB Wide)
aclr (LAB Wide)
ALD/PRE
CLRN
D
Q
ENA
ADATA
Register chain
connection
LUT
LUT
LUT
Carry-Out1Carry-Out0
LAB Carry-In
Carry-In0
Carry-In1
(1)
sclear
(LAB Wide)
sload
(LAB Wide)
LUT chain
connection
Register
chain output
Row, column, and
direct link routing
Row, column, and
direct link routing
Local routing
aload
(LAB Wide)
Register Feedback
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Logic Elements
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
The speed advantage of the carry-select chain is in the parallel pre-computation of
carry chains. Because the LAB carry-in selects the precomputed carry chain, not every
LE is in the critical path. Only the propagation delays between LAB carry-in
generation (
LE5
and
LE10
) are now part of the critical path. This feature allows the
MAX V architecture to implement high-speed counters, adders, multipliers, parity
functions, and comparators of arbitrary width.
Figure 2–9 shows the carry-select circuitry in an LAB for a 10-bit full adder. One
portion of the LUT generates the sum of two bits using the input signals and the
appropriate carry-in bit; the sum is routed to the output of the LE. The register can be
bypassed for simple adders or used for accumulator functions. Another portion of the
LUT generates carry-out bits. An LAB-wide carry-in bit selects which chain is used for
the addition of given inputs. The carry-in signal for each chain,
carry-in0
or
carry-in1
, selects the carry-out to carry forward to the carry-in signal of the
next-higher-order bit. The final carry-out signal is routed to an LE, where it is fed to
local, row, or column interconnects.
Figure 2–9. Carry-Select Chain
LE3
LE2
LE1
LE0
A1
B1
A2
B2
A3
B3
A4
B4
Sum1
Sum2
Sum3
Sum4
LE9
LE8
LE7
LE6
A7
B7
A8
B8
A9
B9
A10
B10
Sum7
LE5
A6
B6
Sum6
LE4
A5
B5
Sum5
Sum8
Sum9
Sum10
01
01
LAB Carry-In
LAB Carry-Out
LUT
LUT
LUT
LUT
data1
LAB Carry-In
data2
Carry-In0
Carry-In1
Carry-Out0 Carry-Out1
Sum
To top of adjacent LAB
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–13
Logic Elements
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
The Quartus II software automatically creates carry chain logic during design
processing, or you can create it manually during design entry. Parameterized
functions such as LPM functions automatically take advantage of carry chains for the
appropriate functions. The Quartus II software creates carry chains longer than 10 LEs
by linking adjacent LABs within the same row together automatically. A carry chain
can extend horizontally up to one full LAB row, but does not extend between LAB
rows.
Clear and Preset Logic Control
LAB-wide signals control the logic for the register’s clear and preset signals. The LE
directly supports an asynchronous clear and preset function. The register preset is
achieved through the asynchronous load of a logic high. MAX V devices support
simultaneous preset/asynchronous load and clear signals. An asynchronous clear
signal takes precedence if both signals are asserted simultaneously. Each LAB
supports up to two clears and one preset signal.
In addition to the clear and preset ports, MAX V devices provide a chip-wide reset pin
(
DEV_CLRn
) that resets all registers in the device. An option set before compilation in
the Quartus II software controls this pin. This chip-wide reset overrides all other
control signals and uses its own dedicated routing resources without using any of the
four global resources. Driving this signal low before or during power-up prevents
user mode from releasing clears within the design. This allows you to control when
clear is released on a device that has just been powered-up. If not set for its chip-wide
reset function, the
DEV_CLRn
pin is a regular I/O pin.
By default, all registers in MAX V devices are set to power-up low. However, this
power-up state can be set to high on individual registers during design entry using
the Quartus II software.
LE RAM
The Quartus II memory compiler can configure the unused LEs as LE RAM.
MAX V devices support the following memory types:
FIFO synchronous R/W
FIFO asynchronous R/W
1 port SRAM
2 port SRAM
3 port SRAM
shift registers
fFor more information about memory, refer to the Internal Memory (RAM and ROM)
User Guide.
2–14 Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture
MultiTrack Interconnect
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
MultiTrack Interconnect
In the MAX V architecture, connections between LEs, the UFM, and device I/O pins
are provided by the MultiTrack interconnect structure. The MultiTrack interconnect
consists of continuous, performance-optimized routing lines used for inter- and
intra-design block connectivity. The Quartus II Compiler automatically places critical
design paths on faster interconnects to improve design performance.
The MultiTrack interconnect consists of row and column interconnects that span fixed
distances. A routing structure with fixed length resources for all devices allows
predictable and short delays between logic levels instead of large delays associated
with global or long routing lines. Dedicated row interconnects route signals to and
from LABs within the same row. These row resources include:
DirectLink interconnects between LABs
R4 interconnects traversing four LABs to the right or left
The DirectLink interconnect allows an LAB to drive into the local interconnect of its
left and right neighbors. The DirectLink interconnect provides fast communication
between adjacent LABs and blocks without using row interconnect resources.
The R4 interconnects span four LABs and are used for fast row connections in a
four-LAB region. Every LAB has its own set of R4 interconnects to drive either left or
right. Figure 2–10 shows R4 interconnect connections from an LAB. R4 interconnects
can drive and be driven by row IOEs. For LAB interfacing, a primary LAB or
horizontal LAB neighbor can drive a given R4 interconnect. For R4 interconnects that
drive to the right, the primary LAB and right neighbor can drive on to the
interconnect. For R4 interconnects that drive to the left, the primary LAB and its left
neighbor can drive on to the interconnect. R4 interconnects can drive other R4
interconnects to extend the range of LABs they can drive. R4 interconnects can also
drive C4 interconnects for connections from one row to another.
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–15
MultiTrack Interconnect
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
The column interconnect operates similarly to the row interconnect. Each column of
LABs is served by a dedicated column interconnect, which vertically routes signals to
and from LABs and row and column IOEs. These column resources include:
LUT chain interconnects within an LAB
Register chain interconnects within an LAB
C4 interconnects traversing a distance of four LABs in an up and down direction
MAX V devices include an enhanced interconnect structure within LABs for routing
LE output to LE input connections faster using LUT chain connections and register
chain connections. The LUT chain connection allows the combinational output of an
LE to directly drive the fast input of the LE right below it, bypassing the local
interconnect. These resources can be used as a high-speed connection for wide fan-in
functions from
LE 1
to
LE 10
in the same LAB. The register chain connection allows
the register output of one LE to connect directly to the register input of the next LE in
the LAB for fast shift registers. The Quartus II Compiler automatically takes
advantage of these resources to improve utilization and performance. Figure 2–11
shows the LUT chain and register chain interconnects.
Figure 2–10. R4 Interconnect Connections
Notes to Figure 2–10:
(1) C4 interconnects can drive R4 interconnects.
(2) This pattern is repeated for every LAB in the LAB row.
Primary
LAB (2)
R4 Interconnect
Driving Left
Adjacent LAB can
drive onto another
LAB’s R4 Interconnect
C4 Column Interconnects (1)
R4 Interconnect
Driving Right
LAB
Neighbor
LAB
Neighbor
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MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
The C4 interconnects span four LABs up or down from a source LAB. Every LAB has
its own set of C4 interconnects to drive either up or down. Figure 2–12 shows the C4
interconnect connections from an LAB in a column. The C4 interconnects can drive
and be driven by column and row IOEs. For LAB interconnection, a primary LAB or
its vertical LAB neighbor can drive a given C4 interconnect. C4 interconnects can
drive each other to extend their range as well as drive row interconnects for
column-to-column connections.
Figure 2–11. LUT Chain and Register Chain Interconnects
LE0
LE1
LE2
LE3
LE4
LE5
LE6
LE7
LE8
LE9
LUT Chain
Routing to
Adjacent LE
Local
Interconnect
Register Chain
Routing to Adjacen
t
LE's Register Input
Local Interconnect
Routing Among LEs
in the LAB
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–17
MultiTrack Interconnect
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Figure 2–12. C4 Interconnect Connections (Note 1)
Note to Figure 2–12:
(1) Each C4 interconnect can drive either up or down four rows.
C4 Interconnect
Drives Local and R
4
Interconnects
Up to Four Rows
Adjacent LAB can
drive onto neighboring
LAB's C4 interconnect
C4 Interconnect
Driving Up
C4 Interconnect
Driving Down
LAB
Row
Interconnect
Local
Interconnect
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MultiTrack Interconnect
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
The UFM block communicates with the logic array similar to LAB-to-LAB interfaces.
The UFM block connects to row and column interconnects and has local interconnect
regions driven by row and column interconnects. This block also has DirectLink
interconnects for fast connections to and from a neighboring LAB. For more
information about the UFM interface to the logic array, refer too “User Flash Memory
Block” on page 2–21.
Table 2–2 lists the MAX V device routing scheme.
Table 2–2. Routing Scheme for MAX V Devices
Source
Destination
LUT
Chain
Register
Chain
Local
(1)
DirectLink
(1) R4 (1) C4 (1) LE UFM
Block
Column
IOE
Row
IOE
Fast I/O
(1)
LUT Chain v——
Register Chain v——
Local
Interconnect ——— — vv vv
DirectLink
Interconnect ——v——
R4 Interconnect vvv—— —
C4 Interconnect vvv—— —
LE vvv v vv—— vvv
UFM Block vvvv—— —
Column IOE v—— —
Row IOE vvv—— —
Note to Table 2–2:
(1) These categories are interconnects.
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–19
Global Signals
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Global Signals
Each MAX V device has four dual-purpose dedicated clock pins (
GCLK[3..0]
, two
pins on the left side and two pins on the right side) that drive the global clock network
for clocking, as shown in Figure 2–13. These four pins can also be used as GPIOs if
they are not used to drive the global clock network.
The four global clock lines in the global clock network drive throughout the entire
device. The global clock network can provide clocks for all resources within the
device including LEs, LAB local interconnect, IOEs, and the UFM block. The global
clock lines can also be used for global control signals, such as clock enables,
synchronous or asynchronous clears, presets, output enables, or protocol control
signals such as
TRDY
and
IRDY
for the PCI I/O standard. Internal logic can drive the
global clock network for internally-generated global clocks and control signals.
Figure 2–13 shows the various sources that drive the global clock network.
The global clock network drives to individual LAB column signals, LAB column
clocks
[3..0]
, that span an entire LAB column from the top to the bottom of the
device. Unused global clocks or control signals in an LAB column are turned off at the
LAB column clock buffers shown in Figure 2–14. The LAB column clocks
[3..0]
are
multiplexed down to two LAB clock signals and one LAB clear signal. Other control
signal types route from the global clock network into the LAB local interconnect. For
more information, refer to “LAB Control Signals” on page 2–6.
Figure 2–13. Global Clock Generation
Note to Figure 2–13:
(1) Any I/O pin can use a MultiTrack interconnect to route as a logic array-generated global clock signal.
4
4
GCLK0
Global Clock
Network
GCLK1
GCLK2
GCLK3
Logic Array(1)
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Global Signals
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
Figure 2–14. Global Clock Network (Note 1)
Notes to Figure 2–14:
(1) LAB column clocks in I/O block regions provide high fan-out output enable signals.
(2) LAB column clocks drive to the UFM block.
UFM Block (2)
CFM Block
I/O Block Region
I/O Block Region
I/O Block Region
LAB Column
clock[3..0]
LAB Column
clock[3..0]
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–21
User Flash Memory Block
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
User Flash Memory Block
MAX V devices feature a single UFM block, which can be used like a serial EEPROM
for storing non-volatile information up to 8,192 bits. The UFM block connects to the
logic array through the MultiTrack interconnect, allowing any LE to interface to the
UFM block. Figure 2–15 shows the UFM block and interface signals. The logic array is
used to create customer interface or protocol logic to interface the UFM block data
outside of the device. The UFM block offers the following features:
Non-volatile storage up to 16-bit wide and 8,192 total bits
Two sectors for partitioned sector erase
Built-in internal oscillator that optionally drives logic array
Program, erase, and busy signals
Auto-increment addressing
Serial interface to logic array with programmable interface
Figure 2–15. UFM Block and Interface Signals
OSC 4
Program
Erase
Control
UFM Sector 1
UFM Sector 0
:
_
Address
Register
PROGRAM
ERASE
OSC_ENA
RTP_BUSY
BUSY
OSC
Data Register
UFM Block
DRDin DRDout
ARCLK
ARSHFT
ARDin
DRCLK
DRSHFT
16 16
9
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User Flash Memory Block
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
UFM Storage
Each device stores up to 8,192 bits of data in the UFM block. Table 2–3 lists the data
size, sector, and address sizes for the UFM block.
There are 512 locations with 9-bit addressing ranging from
000h
to
1FFh
. The sector 0
address space is
000h
to
0FFh
and the sector 1 address space is from
100h
to
1FFh
. The
data width is up to 16 bits of data. The Quartus II software automatically creates logic
to accommodate smaller read or program data widths. Erasure of the UFM involves
individual sector erasing (that is, one erase of sector 0 and one erase of sector 1 is
required to erase the entire UFM block). Because sector erase is required before a
program or write operation, having two sectors enables a sector size of data to be left
untouched while the other sector is erased and programmed with new data.
Internal Oscillator
As shown in Figure 2–15, the dedicated circuitry within the UFM block contains an
oscillator. The dedicated circuitry uses this oscillator internally for its read and
program operations. This oscillator's divide by 4 output can drive out of the UFM
block as a logic interface clock source or for general-purpose logic clocking. The
typical
OSC
output signal frequency ranges from 3.9 to 5.3 MHz, and its exact
frequency of operation is not programmable.
The UFM internal oscillator can be instantiated using the MegaWizard Plug-In
Manager. You can also use the MAX II/MAX V Oscillator megafunction to instantiate
the UFM oscillator without using the UFM memory block.
Table 2–3. UFM Array Size
Device Total Bits Sectors Address Bits Data Width
5M40Z 8,192 2 (4,096 bits per sector) 9 16
5M80Z 8,192 2 (4,096 bits per sector) 9 16
5M160Z 8,192 2 (4,096 bits per sector) 9 16
5M240Z 8,192 2 (4,096 bits per sector) 9 16
5M570Z 8,192 2 (4,096 bits per sector) 9 16
5M1270Z 8,192 2 (4,096 bits per sector) 9 16
5M2210Z 8,192 2 (4,096 bits per sector) 9 16
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–23
User Flash Memory Block
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Program, Erase, and Busy Signals
The UFM block’s dedicated circuitry automatically generates the necessary internal
program and erase algorithm after the
PROGRAM
or
ERASE
input signals have been
asserted. The
PROGRAM
or
ERASE
signal must be asserted until the busy signal deasserts,
indicating the UFM internal program or erase operation has completed. The UFM
block also supports JTAG as the interface for programming and reading.
fFor more information about programming and erasing the UFM block, refer to the
User Flash Memory in MAX V Devices chapter.
Auto-Increment Addressing
The UFM block supports standard read or stream read operations. The stream read is
supported with an auto-increment address feature. Deasserting the
ARSHIFT
signal
while clocking the
ARCLK
signal increments the address register value to read
consecutive locations from the UFM array.
Serial Interface
The UFM block supports a serial interface with serial address and data signals. The
internal shift registers within the UFM block for address and data are 9 bits and 16 bits
wide, respectively. The Quartus II software automatically generates interface logic in
LEs for a parallel address and data interface to the UFM block. Other standard
protocol interfaces such as SPI are also automatically generated in LE logic by the
Quartus II software.
fFor more information about the UFM interface signals and the Quartus II LE-based
alternate interfaces, refer to the User Flash Memory in MAX V Devices chapter.
2–24 Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture
User Flash Memory Block
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
UFM Block to Logic Array Interface
The UFM block is a small partition of the flash memory that contains the CFM block,
as shown in Figure 2–1 and Figure 2–2. The UFM block for the 5M40Z, 5M80Z,
5M160Z, and 5M240Z devices is located on the left side of the device adjacent to the
left most LAB column. The UFM blocks for the 5M570Z, 5M1270Z, and 5M2210Z
devices are located at the bottom left of the device. The UFM input and output signals
interface to all types of interconnects (R4 interconnect, C4 interconnect, and
DirectLink interconnect to/from adjacent LAB rows). The UFM signals can also be
driven from global clocks,
GCLK[3..0]
. The interface regions for the 5M40Z, 5M80Z,
5M160Z, and 5M240Z devices are shown in Figure 2–16. The interface regions for
5M570Z, 5M1270Z, and 5M2210Z devices are shown in Figure 2–17.
Figure 2–16. 5M40Z, 5M80Z, 5M160Z, and 5M240Z UFM Block LAB Row Interface (Note 1),(2)
Notes to Figure 2–16:
(1) The UFM block inputs and outputs can drive to and from all types of interconnects, not only DirectLink interconnects
from adjacent row LABs.
(2) Not applicable to the T144 package of the 5M240Z device.
UFM Block
CFM Block
PROGRAM
ERASE
OSC_ENA
DRDin
DRCLK
DRSHFT
ARin
ARCLK
ARSHFT
DRDout
OSC
BUSY
RTP_BUSY
LAB
LAB
LAB
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–25
Core Voltage
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Core Voltage
The MAX V architecture supports a 1.8-V core voltage on the VCCINT supply. You must
use a 1.8-V VCC external supply to power the
VCCINT
pins.
Figure 2–17. 5M240Z, 5M570Z, 5M1270Z, and 5M2210Z UFM Block LAB Row Interface (Note 1)
Note to Figure 2–17:
(1) Only applicable to the T144 package of the 5M240Z device.
RTP_BUSY
BUSY
OSC
DRDout
DRDin
PROGRAM
ERASE
OSC_ENA
ARCLK
ARSHFT
DRDCLK
DRDSHFT
ARDin
UFM Block
CFM Block
LAB
LAB
LAB
Figure 2–18. Core Voltage Feature in MAX V Devices
MAX V Device
1.8-V on
VCCINT Pins
1.8-V Core
Voltage
2–26 Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture
I/O Structure
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
I/O Structure
IOEs support many features, including:
LVTTL, LVCMOS, LVDS, and RSDS I/O standards
3.3-V, 32-bit, 33-MHz PCI compliance
JTAG boundary-scan test (BST) support
Programmable drive strength control
Weak pull-up resistors during power-up and in system programming
Slew-rate control
Tri-state buffers with individual output enable control
Bus-hold circuitry
Programmable pull-up resistors in user mode
Unique output enable per pin
Open-drain outputs
Schmitt trigger inputs
Fast I/O connection
Programmable input delay
MAX V device IOEs contain a bidirectional I/O buffer. Figure 2–19 shows the MAX V
IOE structure. Registers from adjacent LABs can drive to or be driven from the IOE’s
bidirectional I/O buffers. The Quartus II software automatically attempts to place
registers in the adjacent LAB with fast I/O connection to achieve the fastest possible
clock-to-output and registered output enable timing. When the fast input registers
option is enabled, the Quartus II software automatically routes the register to
guarantee zero hold time. You can set timing assignments in the Quartus II software
to achieve desired I/O timing.
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–27
I/O Structure
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Fast I/O Connection
A dedicated fast I/O connection from the adjacent LAB to the IOEs within an I/O
block provides faster output delays for clock-to-output and tPD propagation delays.
This connection exists for data output signals, not output enable signals or input
signals. Figure 2–20, Figure 2–21, and Figure 2–22 illustrate the fast I/O connection.
Figure 2–19. IOE Structure for MAX V Devices
Notes to Figure 2–19:
(1) Available only in I/O bank 3 of 5M1270Z and 5M2210Z devices.
(2) The programmable pull-up resistor is active during power-up, in-system programming (ISP), and if the device is unprogrammed.
Data_in
Optional Schmitt
Trigger Input
Drive Strength Control
Open-Drain Output
Slew Control
Fast_out
Data_out OE
Optional
PCI Clamp (1)
Programmable
Pull-Up (2)
VCCIO VCCIO
I/O Pin
Optional Bus-Hold
Circuit
DEV_OE
Programmable
Input Delay
2–28 Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture
I/O Structure
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
I/O Blocks
The IOEs are located in I/O blocks around the periphery of the MAX V device. There
are up to seven IOEs per row I/O block and up to four IOEs per column I/O block.
Each column or row I/O block interfaces with its adjacent LAB and MultiTrack
interconnect to distribute signals throughout the device. The row I/O blocks drive
row, column, or DirectLink interconnects. The column I/O blocks drive column
interconnects.
15M40Z, 5M80Z, 5M160Z, and 5M240Z devices have a maximum of five IOEs per row
I/O block.
Figure 2–20 shows how a row I/O block connects to the logic array.
Figure 2–20. Row I/O Block Connection to the Interconnect (Note 1)
Note to Figure 2–20:
(1) Each of the seven IOEs in the row I/O block can have one data_out or fast_out output, one OE output, and
one data_in input.
7
R4 Interconnects C4 Interconnects
I/O Block Local
Interconnect
data_in[6..0]
data_out
[6..0]
7
OE
[6..0]
7
7
fast_out
[6..0]
Row I/O Block
Contains up to
Seven IOEs
Direct Link
Interconnect
to Adjacent LAB
Direct Link
Interconnect
from Adjacent LAB
LAB Column
clock [3..0]
LAB Local
Interconnect
LAB Row
I/O Block
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–29
I/O Structure
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Figure 2–21 shows how a column I/O block connects to the logic array.
I/O Standards and Banks
Table 2–4 lists the I/O standards supported by MAX V devices.
Figure 2–21. Column I/O Block Connection to the Interconnect (Note 1)
Note to Figure 2–21:
(1) Each of the four IOEs in the column I/O block can have one data_out or fast_out output, one OE output, and
one data_in input.
Column I/O
Block Contains
Up To 4 IOEs
I/O Block
Local Interconnect
R4 Interconnects
LAB Local
Interconnect
C4 Interconnects
LAB Local
Interconnect
C4 Interconnects
4
LAB LAB LAB
data_out
[3..0]
4
OE
[3..0]
4
fast_out
[3..0]
Fast I/O
Interconnect
Path
4
data_in
[3..0]
Column I/O Block
LAB Local
Interconnect
LAB Column
Clock [3..0]
Table 2–4. MAX V I/O Standards (Part 1 of 2)
I/O Standard Type Output Supply Voltage (VCCIO)
(V)
3.3-V LVTTL/LVCMOS Single-ended 3.3
2.5-V LVTTL/LVCMOS Single-ended 2.5
1.8-V LVTTL/LVCMOS Single-ended 1.8
1.5-V LVCMOS Single-ended 1.5
1.2-V LVCMOS Single-ended 1.2
2–30 Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture
I/O Structure
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
The 5M40Z, 5M80Z, 5M160Z, 5M240Z, and 5M570Z devices support two I/O banks,
as shown in Figure 2–22. Each of these banks support all the LVTTL, LVCMOS, LVDS,
and RSDS standards shown in Table 2–4. PCI compliant I/O is not supported in these
devices and banks.
3.3-V PCI (1) Single-ended 3.3
LVDS (2) Differential 2.5
RSDS (3) Differential 2.5
Notes to Table 2–4:
(1) The 3.3-V PCI compliant I/O is supported in Bank 3 of the 5M1270Z and 5M2210Z devices.
(2) MAX V devices only support emulated LVDS output using a three resistor network (LVDS_E_3R).
(3) MAX V devices only support emulated RSDS output using a three resistor network (RSDS_E_3R).
Figure 2–22. I/O Banks for 5M40Z, 5M80Z, 5M160Z, 5M240Z, and 5M570Z Devices (Note 1), (2)
Notes to Figure 2–22:
(1) Figure 2–22 is a top view of the silicon die.
(2) Figure 2–22 is a graphical representation only. Refer to the pin list and the Quartus II software for exact pin locations.
(3) This I/O standard is not supported in Bank 1.
(4) Emulated LVDS output using a three resistor network (LVDS_E_3R).
(5) Emulated RSDS output using a three resistor network (RSDS_E_3R).
Table 2–4. MAX V I/O Standards (Part 2 of 2)
I/O Standard Type Output Supply Voltage (VCCIO)
(V)
All I/O Banks Support
3.3-V LVTTL/LVCMOS,
2.5-V LVTTL/LVCMOS,
1.8-V LVTTL/LVCMOS,
1.5-V LVCMOS,
1.2-V
LVDS (4)
RSDS (5)
,
LVCMOS (3),
I/O Bank
2
I/O Bank 1
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–31
I/O Structure
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
The 5M1270Z and 5M2210Z devices support four I/O banks, as shown in Figure 2–23.
Each of these banks support all of the LVTTL, LVCMOS, LVDS, and RSDS standards
shown in Table 2–4. PCI compliant I/O is supported in Bank 3. Bank 3 supports the
PCI clamping diode on inputs and PCI drive compliance on outputs. You must use
Bank 3 for designs requiring PCI compliant I/O pins. The Quartus II software
automatically places I/O pins in this bank if assigned with the PCI I/O standard.
Each I/O bank has dedicated VCCIO pins that determine the voltage standard support
in that bank. A single device can support 1.2-V, 1.5-V, 1.8-V, 2.5-V, and 3.3-V interfaces;
each individual bank can support a different standard. Each I/O bank can support
multiple standards with the same VCCIO for input and output pins. For example, when
VCCIO is 3.3 V, Bank 3 can support LVTTL, LVCMOS, and 3.3-V PCI. VCCIO powers
both the input and output buffers in MAX V devices.
The JTAG pins for MAX V devices are dedicated pins that cannot be used as regular
I/O pins. The pins
TMS
,
TDI
,
TDO
, and
TCK
support all the I/O standards shown in
Table 2–4 on page 2–29 except for PCI and 1.2-V LVCMOS. These pins reside in Bank 1
for all MAX V devices and their I/O standard support is controlled by the VCCIO
setting for Bank 1.
Figure 2–23. I/O Banks for 5M1270Z and 5M2210Z Devices (Note 1), (2)
Notes to Figure 2–23:
(1) Figure 2–23 is a top view of the silicon die.
(2) Figure 2–23 is a graphical representation only. Refer to the pin list and the Quartus II software for exact pin locations.
(3) This I/O standard is not supported in Bank 1.
(4) Emulated LVDS output using a three resistor network (LVDS_E_3R).
(5) Emulated RSDS output using a three resistor network (RSDS_E_3R).
I/O Bank 2
I/O Bank 3
I/O Bank 4
I/O Bank 1
Also Support
s
the 3.3-V PCI
I/O Standard
All I/O Banks Support
3.3-V LVTTL/LVCMOS,
2.5-V LVTTL/LVCMOS,
1.8-V LVTTL/LVCMOS,
1.5-V LVCMOS,
1.2-V LVCMOS (3),
LVDS (4),
RSDS(5)
2–32 Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture
I/O Structure
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
PCI Compliance
The MAX V 5M1270Z and 5M2210Z devices are compliant with PCI applications as
well as all 3.3-V electrical specifications in the PCI Local Bus Specification Revision 2.2.
These devices are also large enough to support PCI intellectual property (IP) cores.
Table 2–5 shows the MAX V device speed grades that meet the PCI timing
specifications.
LVDS and RSDS Channels
The MAX V device supports emulated LVDS and RSDS outputs on both row and
column I/O banks. You can configure the rows and columns as emulated LVDS or
RSDS output buffers that use two single-ended output buffers with three external
resistor networks.
Schmitt Trigger
The input buffer for each MAX V device I/O pin has an optional Schmitt trigger
setting for the 3.3-V and 2.5-V standards. The Schmitt trigger allows input buffers to
respond to slow input edge rates with a fast output edge rate. Most importantly,
Schmitt triggers provide hysteresis on the input buffer, preventing slow-rising noisy
input signals from ringing or oscillating on the input signal driven into the logic array.
This provides system noise tolerance on MAX V inputs, but adds a small, nominal
input delay.
The JTAG input pins (
TMS
,
TCK
, and
TDI
) have Schmitt trigger buffers that are always
enabled.
1The
TCK
input is susceptible to high pulse glitches when the input signal fall time is
greater than 200 ns for all I/O standards.
Table 2–5. 3.3-V PCI Electrical Specifications and PCI Timing Support for MAX V Devices
Device 33-MHz PCI
5M1270Z All Speed Grades
5M2210Z All Speed Grades
Table 2–6. LVDS and RSDS Channels supported in MAX V Devices (Note 1)
Device 64 MBGA 64 EQFP 68 MBGA 100 TQFP 100 MBGA 144 TQFP 256 FBGA 324 FBGA
5M40Z10 eTx20 eTx——————
5M80Z10 eTx20 eTx20 eTx33 eTx————
5M160Z 20 eTx 20 eTx 33 eTx 33 eTx
5M240Z 20 eTx 33 eTx 33 eTx 49 eTx
5M570Z 28 eTx 28 eTx 49 eTx 75 eTx
5M1270Z 42 eTx 90 eTx 115 eTx
5M2210Z — ————83 eTx115 eTx
Note to Table 2–6:
(1) eTx = emulated LVDS output buffers (LVDS_E_3R) or emulated RSDS output buffers (RSDS_E_3R).
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–33
I/O Structure
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Output Enable Signals
Each MAX V IOE output buffer supports output enable signals for tri-state control.
The output enable signal can originate from the
GCLK[3..0]
global signals or from the
MultiTrack interconnect. The MultiTrack interconnect routes output enable signals
and allows for a unique output enable for each output or bidirectional pin.
MAX V devices also provide a chip-wide output enable pin (
DEV_OE
) to control the
output enable for every output pin in the design. An option set before compilation in
the Quartus II software controls this pin. This chip-wide output enable uses its own
routing resources and does not use any of the four global resources. If this option is
turned on, all outputs on the chip operate normally when
DEV_OE
is asserted. When
the pin is deasserted, all outputs are tri-stated. If this option is turned off, the
DEV_OE
pin is disabled when the device operates in user mode and is available as a user I/O
pin.
Programmable Drive Strength
The output buffer for each MAX V device I/O pin has two levels of programmable
drive strength control for each of the LVTTL and LVCMOS I/O standards.
Programmable drive strength provides system noise reduction control for high
performance I/O designs. Although a separate slew-rate control feature exists, using
the lower drive strength setting provides signal slew-rate control to reduce system
noise and signal overshoot without the large delay adder associated with the
slew-rate control feature. Table 2–7 lists the possible settings for the I/O standards
with drive strength control. The Quartus II software uses the maximum current
strength as the default setting. The PCI I/O standard is always set at 20 mA with no
alternate setting.
1The programmable drive strength feature can be used simultaneously with the
slew-rate control feature.
Table 2–7. Programmable Drive Strength (Note 1)
I/O Standard IOH/IOL Current Strength Setting (mA)
3.3-V LVTTL 16
8
3.3-V LVCMOS 8
4
2.5-V LVTTL/LVCMOS 14
7
1.8-V LVTTL/LVCMOS 6
3
1.5-V LVCMOS 4
2
1.2-V LVCMOS 3
Note to Table 2–7:
(1) The IOH current strength numbers shown are for a condition of a VOUT = VOH minimum, where the VOH
minimum is specified by the I/O standard. The IOL current strength numbers shown are for a condition of a
VOUT = VOL maximum, where the VOL maximum is specified by the I/O standard. For 2.5-V LVTTL/LVCMOS,
the IOH condition is VOUT = 1.7 V and the IOL condition is VOUT = 0.7 V.
2–34 Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture
I/O Structure
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
Slew-Rate Control
The output buffer for each MAX V device I/O pin has a programmable output
slew-rate control that can be configured for low noise or high-speed performance. A
faster slew rate provides high-speed transitions for high-performance systems.
However, these fast transitions may introduce noise transients into the system. A slow
slew rate reduces system noise, but adds a nominal output delay to rising and falling
edges. The lower the voltage standard (for example, 1.8-V LVTTL) the larger the
output delay when slow slew is enabled. Each I/O pin has an individual slew-rate
control, allowing you to specify the slew rate on a pin-by-pin basis. The slew-rate
control affects both the rising and falling edges. If no slew-rate control is specified, the
Quartus II software defaults to a fast slew rate.
1The slew-rate control feature can be used simultaneously with the programmable
drive strength feature.
Open-Drain Output
MAX V devices provide an optional open-drain (equivalent to open-collector) output
for each I/O pin. This open-drain output enables the device to provide system-level
control signals (for example, interrupt and write enable signals) that can be asserted
by any of several devices. This output can also provide an additional wired-OR plane.
Programmable Ground Pins
Each unused I/O pin on MAX V devices can be used as an additional ground pin.
This programmable ground feature does not require the use of the associated LEs in
the device. In the Quartus II software, unused pins can be set as programmable GND
on a global default basis or they can be individually assigned. Unused pins also have
the option of being set as tri-stated input pins.
Bus-Hold
Each MAX V device I/O pin provides an optional bus-hold feature. The bus-hold
circuitry can hold the signal on an I/O pin at its last-driven state. Because the bus-
hold feature holds the last-driven state of the pin until the next input signal is present,
an external pull-up or pull-down resistor is not necessary to hold a signal level when
the bus is tri-stated.
The bus-hold circuitry also pulls un-driven pins away from the input threshold
voltage where noise can cause unintended high-frequency switching. You can select
this feature individually for each I/O pin. The bus-hold output will drive no higher
than VCCIO to prevent overdriving signals. If the bus-hold feature is enabled, the
device cannot use the programmable pull-up option.
The bus-hold circuitry is only active after the device has fully initialized. The bus-hold
circuit captures the value on the pin present at the moment user mode is entered.
Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture 2–35
I/O Structure
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Programmable Pull-Up Resistor
Each MAX V device I/O pin provides an optional programmable pull-up resistor
during user mode. If you enable this feature for an I/O pin, the pull-up resistor holds
the output to the VCCIO level of the output pin’s bank.
1The programmable pull-up resistor feature should not be used at the same time as the
bus-hold feature on a given I/O pin.
1The programmable pull-up resistor is active during power-up, ISP, and if the device is
unprogrammed.
Programmable Input Delay
The MAX V IOE includes a programmable input delay that is activated to ensure zero
hold times. A path where a pin directly drives a register, with minimal routing
between the two, may require the delay to ensure zero hold time. However, a path
where a pin drives a register through long routing or through combinational logic
may not require the delay to achieve a zero hold time. The Quartus II software uses
this delay to ensure zero hold times when needed.
MultiVolt I/O Interface
The MAX V architecture supports the MultiVolt I/O interface feature, which allows
MAX V devices in all packages to interface with systems of different supply voltages.
The devices have one set of
VCC
pins for internal operation (VCCINT), and up to four
sets for input buffers and I/O output driver buffers (VCCIO), depending on the
number of I/O banks available in the devices where each set of
VCCIO
pins powers one
I/O bank. The 5M40Z, 5M80Z, 5M160Z, 5M240Z, and 5M570Z devices each have two
I/O banks while the 5M1270Z and 5M2210Z devices each have four I/O banks.
Connect
VCCIO
pins to either a 1.2-, 1.5-, 1.8-, 2.5-, or 3.3-V power supply, depending
on the output requirements. The output levels are compatible with systems of the
same voltage as the power supply (that is, when
VCCIO
pins are connected to a 1.5-V
power supply, the output levels are compatible with 1.5-V systems). When
VCCIO
pins
are connected to a 3.3-V power supply, the output high is 3.3 V and is compatible with
3.3-V or 5.0-V systems. Table 2–8 summarizes MAX V MultiVolt I/O support.
Table 2–8. MultiVolt I/O Support in MAX V Devices (Part 1 of 2) (Note 1)
VCCIO (V)
Input Signal Output Signal
1.2 V1.5 V1.8 V2.5 V3.3 V5.0 V1.2 V1.5 V1.8 V2.5 V3.3 V5.0 V
1.2 v—————v————
1.5 vvvvvv————
1.8 vvvvv (2) v (2) v———
2.5 ———vvv (3) v (3) v (3) v——
2–36 Chapter 2: MAX V Architecture
Document Revision History
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
Document Revision History
Table 2–9 lists the revision history for this chapter.
3.3 ———v (4) vv (5) v (6) v (6) v (6) v (6) vv (7)
Notes to Table 2–8:
(1) To drive inputs higher than VCCIO but less than 4.0 V including the overshoot, disable the I/O clamp diode. However, to drive 5.0-V signals to
the device, enable the I/O clamp diode to prevent VI from rising above 4.0 V. Use an external diode if the I/O pin does not support the clamp
diode.
(2) When VCCIO = 1.8 V, a MAX V device can drive a 1.2-V or 1.5-V device with 1.8-V tolerant inputs.
(3) When VCCIO = 2.5 V, a MAX V device can drive a 1.2-V, 1.5-V, or 1.8-V device with 2.5-V tolerant inputs.
(4) When VCCIO = 3.3 V and a 2.5-V input signal feeds an input pin, the VCCIO supply current will be slightly larger than expected.
(5) MAX V devices can be 5.0-V tolerant with the use of an external resistor and the internal I/O clamp diode on the 5M1270Z and 5M2210Z devices.
Use an external clamp diode if the internal clamp diode is not available.
(6) When VCCIO = 3.3 V, a MAX V device can drive a 1.2-V, 1.5-V, 1.8-V, or 2.5-V device with 3.3-V tolerant inputs.
(7) When VCCIO = 3.3 V, a MAX V device can drive a device with 5.0-V TTL inputs but not 5.0-V CMOS inputs. For 5.0-V CMOS, open-drain setting
with internal I/O clamp diode (available only on 5M1270Z and 5M2210Z devices) and external resistor is required. Use an external clamp diode
if the internal clamp diode is not available.
Table 2–8. MultiVolt I/O Support in MAX V Devices (Part 2 of 2) (Note 1)
VCCIO (V)
Input Signal Output Signal
1.2 V1.5 V1.8 V2.5 V3.3 V5.0 V1.2 V1.5 V1.8 V2.5 V3.3 V5.0 V
Table 2–9. Document Revision History
Date Version Changes
December 2010 1.0 Initial release.
MAX V Device Handbook
May 2011
MV51003-1.2
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3. DC and Switching Characteristics for
MAX V Devices
This chapter covers the electrical and switching characteristics for MAX®V devices.
Electrical characteristics include operating conditions and power consumptions. This
chapter also describes the timing model and specifications.
You must consider the recommended DC and switching conditions described in this
chapter to maintain the highest possible performance and reliability of the MAX V
devices.
This chapter contains the following sections:
“Operating Conditions” on page 3–1
“Power Consumption” on page 3–10
“Timing Model and Specifications” on page 3–10
Operating Conditions
Table 3–1 through Table 3–15 on page 3–9 list information about absolute maximum
ratings, recommended operating conditions, DC electrical characteristics, and other
specifications for MAX V devices.
Absolute Maximum Ratings
Table 3–1 lists the absolute maximum ratings for the MAX V device family.
Table 3–1. Absolute Maximum Ratings for MAX V Devices (Note 1), (2)
Symbol Parameter Conditions Minimum Maximum Unit
VCCINT Internal supply voltage With respect to ground –0.5 2.4 V
VCCIO I/O supply voltage –0.5 4.6 V
VIDC input voltage –0.5 4.6 V
IOUT DC output current, per pin –25 25 mA
TSTG Storage temperature No bias –65 150 °C
TAMB Ambient temperature Under bias (3) –65 135 °C
TJJunction temperature TQFP and BGA packages
under bias 135 °C
Notes to Table 3–1:
(1) For more information, refer to the Operating Requirements for Altera Devices Data Sheet.
(2) Conditions beyond those listed in Table 3–1 may cause permanent damage to a device. Additionally, device operation at the absolute maximum
ratings for extended periods of time may have adverse affects on the device.
(3) For more information about “under bias” conditions, refer to Table 3–2.
May 2011
MV51003-1.2
3–2 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Operating Conditions
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
Recommended Operating Conditions
Table 3–2 lists recommended operating conditions for the MAX V device family.
Table 3–2. Recommended Operating Conditions for MAX V Devices
Symbol Parameter Conditions Minimum Maximum Unit
VCCINT (1) 1.8-V supply voltage for internal logic and
in-system programming (ISP) MAX V devices 1.71 1.89 V
VCCIO (1)
Supply voltage for I/O buffers, 3.3-V
operation —3.003.60V
Supply voltage for I/O buffers, 2.5-V
operation 2.375 2.625 V
Supply voltage for I/O buffers, 1.8-V
operation —1.711.89V
Supply voltage for I/O buffers, 1.5-V
operation 1.425 1.575 V
Supply voltage for I/O buffers, 1.2-V
operation —1.141.26V
VIInput voltage (2), (3), (4) –0.5 4.0 V
VOOutput voltage 0 VCCIO V
TJOperating junction temperature
Commercial range 0 85 °C
Industrial range –40 100 °C
Extended range (5) –40 125 °C
Notes to Table 3–2:
(1) MAX V device ISP and/or user flash memory (UFM) programming using JTAG or logic array is not guaranteed outside the recommended
operating conditions (for example, if brown-out occurs in the system during a potential write/program sequence to the UFM, Altera recommends
that you read back the UFM contents and verify it against the intended write data).
(2) The minimum DC input is –0.5 V. During transitions, the inputs may undershoot to –2.0 V for input currents less than 100 mA and periods
shorter than 20 ns.
(3) During transitions, the inputs may overshoot to the voltages shown below based on the input duty cycle. The DC case is equivalent to 100%
duty cycle. For more information about 5.0-V tolerance, refer to the Using MAX V Devices in Multi-Voltage Systems chapter.
VIN Max. Duty Cycle
4.0 V 100% (DC)
4.1 V 90%
4.2 V 50%
4.3 V 30%
4.4 V 17%
4.5 V 10%
(4) All pins, including the clock, I/O, and JTAG pins, may be driven before VCCINT and VCCIO are powered.
(5) For the extended temperature range of 100 to 125°C, MAX V UFM programming (erase/write) is only supported using the JTAG interface. UFM
programming using the logic array interface is not guaranteed in this range.
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–3
Operating Conditions
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Programming/Erasure Specifications
Table 3–3 lists the programming/erasure specifications for the MAX V device family.
DC Electrical Characteristics
Table 3–4 lists DC electrical characteristics for the MAX V device family.
Table 3–3. Programming/Erasure Specifications for MAX V Devices
Parameter Block Minimum Typical Maximum Unit
Erase and reprogram cycles UFM — 1000 (1) Cycles
Configuration flash memory (CFM) 100 Cycles
Note to Table 3–3:
(1) This value applies to the commercial grade devices. For the industrial grade devices, the value is 100 cycles.
Table 3–4. DC Electrical Characteristics for MAX V Devices (Note 1) (Part 1 of 2)
Symbol Parameter Conditions Minimum Typical Maximum Unit
IIInput pin leakage current VI = VCCIO max to 0 V (2) –10 10 µA
IOZ
Tri-stated I/O pin leakage
current VO = VCCIO max to 0 V (2) –10 10 µA
ICCSTANDBY
VCCINT supply current
(standby) (3)
5M40Z, 5M80Z, 5M160Z, and
5M240Z (Commercial grade)
(4), (5)
—2590µA
5M240Z (Commercial grade)
(6) —2796µA
5M40Z, 5M80Z, 5M160Z, and
5M240Z (Industrial grade)
(5), (7)
—25139µA
5M240Z (Industrial grade) (6) —27152µA
5M570Z (Commercial grade)
(4) —2796µA
5M570Z (Industrial grade) (7) —27152µA
5M1270Z and 5M2210Z 2 mA
VSCHMITT (8) Hysteresis for Schmitt
trigger input (9)
VCCIO = 3.3 V 400 mV
VCCIO = 2.5 V 190 mV
ICCPOWERUP
VCCINT supply current
during power-up (10) MAX V devices 40 mA
RPULLUP
Value of I/O pin pull-up
resistor during user
mode and ISP
VCCIO = 3.3 V (11) 5 25 k
VCCIO = 2.5 V (11) 10—40k
VCCIO = 1.8 V (11) 25—60k
VCCIO = 1.5 V (11) 45—95k
VCCIO = 1.2 V (11) 80 130 k
3–4 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Operating Conditions
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
IPULLUP
I/O pin pull-up resistor
current when I/O is
unprogrammed
——300µA
CIO
Input capacitance for
user I/O pin ——8pF
CGCLK
Input capacitance for
dual-purpose GCLK/user
I/O pin
——8pF
Notes to Table 3–4:
(1) Typical values are for TA = 25°C, VCCINT = 1.8 V and VCCIO = 1.2, 1.5, 1.8, 2.5, or 3.3 V.
(2) This value is specified for normal device operation. The value may vary during power-up. This applies to all VCCIO settings (3.3, 2.5, 1.8, 1.5,
and 1.2 V).
(3) VI = ground, no load, and no toggling inputs.
(4) Commercial temperature ranges from 0°C to 85°C with the maximum current at 85°C.
(5) Not applicable to the T144 package of the 5M240Z device.
(6) Only applicable to the T144 package of the 5M240Z device.
(7) Industrial temperature ranges from –40°C to 100°C with the maximum current at 100°C.
(8) This value applies to commercial and industrial range devices. For extended temperature range devices, the VSCHMITT typical value is 300 mV
for VCCIO = 3.3 V and 120 mV for VCCIO = 2.5 V.
(9) The
TCK
input is susceptible to high pulse glitches when the input signal fall time is greater than 200 ns for all I/O standards.
(10) This is a peak current value with a maximum duration of tCONFIG time.
(11) Pin pull-up resistance values will lower if an external source drives the pin higher than VCCIO.
Table 3–4. DC Electrical Characteristics for MAX V Devices (Note 1) (Part 2 of 2)
Symbol Parameter Conditions Minimum Typical Maximum Unit
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–5
Operating Conditions
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Output Drive Characteristics
Figure 3–1 shows the typical drive strength characteristics of MAX V devices.
I/O Standard Specifications
Table 3–5 through Table 3–13 on page 3–8 list the I/O standard specifications for the
MAX V device family.
Figure 3–1. Output Drive Characteristics of MAX V Devices (Note 1)
Notes to Figure 3–1:
(1) The DC output current per pin is subject to the absolute maximum rating of Table 3–1 on page 3–1.
(2) 1.2-V VCCIO is only applicable to the maximum drive strength.
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5
Voltage (V)
Typical I
O
Output Current (mA)
3.3-V VCCIO
2.5-V VCCIO
1.8-V VCCIO
1.5-V VCCIO
(Minimum Drive Strength)
MAX V Output Drive I
OH
Characteristics
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5
Voltage (V)
Typical I
O
Output Current (mA)
3.3-V VCCIO
2.5-V VCCIO
1.8-V VCCIO
1.5-V VCCIO
(Minimum Drive Strength)
MAX V Output Drive I
OL
Characteristics
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5
Voltage (V)
Typical I
O
Output Current (mA)
3.3-V VCCIO
2.5-V VCCIO
1.8-V VCCIO
1.5-V VCCIO
(Maximum Drive Strength)
MAX V Output Drive I
OL
Characteristics
1.2-V VCCIO (2)
MAX V Output Drive I
OH
Characteristics
(Maximum Drive Strength)
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5
Voltage (V)
Typical I
O
Output Current (mA)
3.3-V VCCIO
2.5-V VCCIO
1.8-V VCCIO
1.5-V VCCIO
1.2-V VCCIO (2)
Table 3–5. 3.3-V LVTTL Specifications for MAX V Devices
Symbol Parameter Conditions Minimum Maximum Unit
VCCIO I/O supply voltage 3.0 3.6 V
VIH High-level input voltage 1.7 4.0 V
VIL Low-level input voltage –0.5 0.8 V
VOH High-level output voltage IOH = –4 mA (1) 2.4 — V
VOL Low-level output voltage IOL = 4 mA (1) —0.45V
Note to Table 3–5:
(1) This specification is supported across all the programmable drive strength settings available for this I/O standard, as shown in the
MAX V Device Architecture chapter.
3–6 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Operating Conditions
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
Table 3–6. 3.3-V LVCMOS Specifications for MAX V Devices
Symbol Parameter Conditions Minimum Maximum Unit
VCCIO I/O supply voltage 3.0 3.6 V
VIH High-level input voltage 1.7 4.0 V
VIL Low-level input voltage –0.5 0.8 V
VOH High-level output voltage VCCIO = 3.0,
IOH = –0.1 mA (1) VCCIO – 0.2 V
VOL Low-level output voltage VCCIO = 3.0,
IOL = 0.1 mA (1) —0.2V
Note to Table 3–6:
(1) This specification is supported across all the programmable drive strength settings available for this I/O standard, as shown in the
MAX V Device Architecture chapter.
Table 3–7. 2.5-V I/O Specifications for MAX V Devices
Symbol Parameter Conditions Minimum Maximum Unit
VCCIO I/O supply voltage 2.375 2.625 V
VIH High-level input voltage 1.7 4.0 V
VIL Low-level input voltage –0.5 0.7 V
VOH High-level output voltage
IOH = –0.1 mA (1) 2.1 — V
IOH = –1 mA (1) 2.0 — V
IOH = –2 mA (1) 1.7 — V
VOL Low-level output voltage
IOL = 0.1 mA (1) —0.2V
IOL = 1 mA (1) —0.4V
IOL = 2 mA (1) —0.7V
Note to Table 3–7:
(1) This specification is supported across all the programmable drive strength settings available for this I/O standard, as shown in the
MAX V Device Architecture chapter.
Table 3–8. 1.8-V I/O Specifications for MAX V Devices
Symbol Parameter Conditions Minimum Maximum Unit
VCCIO I/O supply voltage 1.71 1.89 V
VIH High-level input voltage 0.65 × VCCIO 2.25 (2) V
VIL Low-level input voltage –0.3 0.35 × VCCIO V
VOH High-level output voltage IOH = –2 mA (1) VCCIO – 0.45 V
VOL Low-level output voltage IOL = 2 mA (1) —0.45V
Notes to Table 3–8:
(1) This specification is supported across all the programmable drive strength settings available for this I/O standard, as shown in the
MAX V Device Architecture chapter.
(2) This maximum VIH reflects the JEDEC specification. The MAX V input buffer can tolerate a VIH maximum of 4.0, as specified by the VI parameter
in Table 3–2 on page 3–2.
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–7
Operating Conditions
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Table 3–9. 1.5-V I/O Specifications for MAX V Devices
Symbol Parameter Conditions Minimum Maximum Unit
VCCIO I/O supply voltage 1.425 1.575 V
VIH High-level input voltage 0.65 × VCCIO VCCIO + 0.3 (2) V
VIL Low-level input voltage –0.3 0.35 × VCCIO V
VOH High-level output voltage IOH = –2 mA (1) 0.75 × VCCIO —V
VOL Low-level output voltage IOL = 2 mA (1) 0.25 × VCCIO V
Notes to Table 3–9:
(1) This specification is supported across all the programmable drive strength settings available for this I/O standard, as shown in the
MAX V Device Architecture chapter.
(2) This maximum VIH reflects the JEDEC specification. The MAX V input buffer can tolerate a VIH maximum of 4.0, as specified by the VI parameter
in Table 3–2 on page 3–2.
Table 3–10. 1.2-V I/O Specifications for MAX V Devices
Symbol Parameter Conditions Minimum Maximum Unit
VCCIO I/O supply voltage 1.14 1.26 V
VIH High-level input voltage 0.8 × VCCIO VCCIO +0.3 V
VIL Low-level input voltage –0.3 0.25 × VCCIO V
VOH High-level output voltage IOH = –2 mA (1) 0.75 × VCCIO —V
VOL Low-level output voltage IOL = 2 mA (1) — 0.25×V
CCIO V
Note to Table 3–10:
(1) This specification is supported across all the programmable drive strength settings available for this I/O standard, as shown in the
MAX V Device Architecture chapter.
Table 3–11. 3.3-V PCI Specifications for MAX V Devices (Note 1)
Symbol Parameter Conditions Minimum Typical Maximum Unit
VCCIO I/O supply voltage 3.0 3.3 3.6 V
VIH High-level input voltage 0.5 × VCCIO —V
CCIO + 0.5 V
VIL Low-level input voltage –0.5 0.3 × VCCIO V
VOH High-level output voltage IOH = –500 µA 0.9 × VCCIO ——V
VOL Low-level output voltage IOL = 1.5 mA 0.1 × VCCIO V
Note to Table 3–11:
(1) 3.3-V PCI I/O standard is only supported in Bank 3 of the 5M1270Z and 5M2210Z devices.
Table 3–12. LVDS Specifications for MAX V Devices (Note 1)
Symbol Parameter Conditions Minimum Typical Maximum Unit
VCCIO I/O supply voltage 2.375 2.5 2.625 V
VOD Differential output voltage swing 247 600 mV
VOS Output offset voltage 1.125 1.25 1.375 V
Note to Table 3–12:
(1) Supports emulated LVDS output using a three-resistor network (LVDS_E_3R).
3–8 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Operating Conditions
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
Bus Hold Specifications
Table 3–14 lists the bus hold specifications for the MAX V device family.
Table 3–13. RSDS Specifications for MAX V Devices (Note 1)
Symbol Parameter Conditions Minimum Typical Maximum Unit
VCCIO I/O supply voltage 2.375 2.5 2.625 V
VOD Differential output voltage swing 247 600 mV
VOS Output offset voltage 1.125 1.25 1.375 V
Note to Table 3–13:
(1) Supports emulated RSDS output using a three-resistor network (RSDS_E_3R).
Table 3–14. Bus Hold Specifications for MAX V Devices
Parameter Conditions
VCCIO Level
Unit1.2 V1.5 V1.8 V2.5 V3.3 V
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
Low sustaining
current VIN > VIL (maximum)10—20—30—50—70—µA
High sustaining
current VIN < VIH (minimum) –10 –20 –30 –50 –70 µA
Low overdrive
current 0 V < VIN < VCCIO — 130 — 160 — 200 — 300 — 500 µA
High overdrive
current 0 V < VIN < VCCIO —–130—–160—–200—–300—–500µA
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–9
Operating Conditions
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Power-Up Timing
Table 3–15 lists the power-up timing characteristics for the MAX V device family.
Table 3–15. Power-Up Timing for MAX V Devices
Symbol Parameter Device Temperature Range Min Typ Max Unit
tCONFIG
The amount of time from
when minimum VCCINT is
reached until the device
enters user mode (1)
5M40Z Commercial and industrial 200 µs
Extended 300 µs
5M80Z Commercial and industrial 200 µs
Extended 300 µs
5M160Z Commercial and industrial 200 µs
Extended 300 µs
5M240Z (2) Commercial and industrial 200 µs
Extended 300 µs
5M240Z (3) Commercial and industrial 300 µs
Extended 400 µs
5M570Z Commercial and industrial 300 µs
Extended 400 µs
5M1270Z (4) Commercial and industrial 300 µs
Extended 400 µs
5M1270Z (5) Commercial and industrial 450 µs
Extended 500 µs
5M2210Z Commercial and industrial 450 µs
Extended 500 µs
Notes to Table 3–15:
(1) For more information about power-on reset (POR) trigger voltage, refer to the Hot Socketing and Power-On Reset in MAX V Devices chapter.
(2) Not applicable to the T144 package of the 5M240Z device.
(3) Only applicable to the T144 package of the 5M240Z device.
(4) Not applicable to the F324 package of the 5M1270Z device.
(5) Only applicable to the F324 package of the 5M1270Z device.
3–10 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Power Consumption
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
Power Consumption
You can use the Altera® PowerPlay Early Power Estimator and PowerPlay Power
Analyzer to estimate the device power.
fFor more information about these power analysis tools, refer to the PowerPlay Early
Power Estimator for Altera CPLDs User Guide and the PowerPlay Power Analysis chapter
in volume 3 of the Quartus II Handbook.
Timing Model and Specifications
MAX V devices timing can be analyzed with the Altera Quartus®II software, a variety
of industry-standard EDA simulators and timing analyzers, or with the timing model
shown in Figure 3–2.
MAX V devices have predictable internal delays that allow you to determine the
worst-case timing of any design. The software provides timing simulation,
point-to-point delay prediction, and detailed timing analysis for device-wide
performance evaluation.
You can derive the timing characteristics of any signal path from the timing model
and parameters of a particular device. You can calculate external timing parameters,
which represent pin-to-pin timing delays, as the sum of the internal parameters.
fFor more information, refer to AN629: Understanding Timing in Altera CPLDs.
Figure 3–2. Timing Model for MAX V Devices
I/O Pin
I/O Input Delay
tIN
INPUT
Global Input Delay
tC4
tR4
Output
Delay
tOD
tXZ
tZX
tLOCAL
tGLOB
Logic Element
I/O Pin
tFASTIO
Output Routing
Delay
User
Flash
Memory
From Adjacent LE
To Adjacent LE
Input Routing
Delay
tDL
tLUT
tC
LUT Delay
Register Control
Delay
Register Delays
tCO
tSU
tH
tPRE
tCLR
Data-In/LUT Chain
Data-Out
tIODR
Output and Output Enable
Data Delay
tIOE
tCOMB
Combinational Path Delay
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–11
Timing Model and Specifications
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Preliminary and Final Timing
This section describes the performance, internal, external, and UFM timing
specifications. All specifications are representative of the worst-case supply voltage
and junction temperature conditions.
Timing models can have either preliminary or final status. The Quartus II software
issues an informational message during the design compilation if the timing models
are preliminary. Table 3–16 lists the status of the MAX V device timing models.
Preliminary status means the timing model is subject to change. Initially, timing
numbers are created using simulation results, process data, and other known
parameters. These tests are used to make the preliminary numbers as close to the
actual timing parameters as possible.
Final timing numbers are based on actual device operation and testing. These
numbers reflect the actual performance of the device under the worst-case voltage
and junction temperature conditions.
Performance
Table 3–17 lists the MAX V device performance for some common designs. All
performance values were obtained with the Quartus II software compilation of
megafunctions.
Table 3–16. Timing Model Status for MAX V Devices
Device Final
5M40Z v
5M80Z v
5M160Z v
5M240Z v
5M570Z v
5M1270Z v
5M2210Z v
Table 3–17. Device Performance for MAX V Devices (Part 1 of 2)
Resource
Used
Design Size and
Function
Resources Used
Performance
Unit
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Mode LEs UFM
Blocks C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
LE
16-bit counter (1) 16 0 184.1 118.3 247.5 201.1 MHz
64-bit counter (1) 64 0 83.2 80.5 154.8 125.8 MHz
16-to-1 multiplexer 11 0 17.4 20.4 8.0 9.3 ns
32-to-1 multiplexer 24 0 12.5 25.3 9.0 11.4 ns
16-bit
XOR
function 5 0 9.0 16.1 6.6 8.2 ns
16-bit decoder with
single address line 5 0 9.2 16.1 6.6 8.2 ns
3–12 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Timing Model and Specifications
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
Internal Timing Parameters
Internal timing parameters are specified on a speed grade basis independent of device
density. Table 3–18 through Table 3–25 on page 3–19 list the MAX V device internal
timing microparameters for LEs, input/output elements (IOEs), UFM blocks, and
MultiTrack interconnects.
fFor more information about each internal timing microparameters symbol, refer to
AN629: Understanding Timing in Altera CPLDs.
UFM
512 × 16 None 3 1 10.0 10.0 10.0 10.0 MHz
512 × 16 SPI (2) 37 1 9.7 9.7 8.0 8.0 MHz
512 × 8 Parallel
(3) 73 1 (4)(4)(4)(4)MHz
512 × 16 I2C (3) 142 1 100 (5) 100 (5) 100 (5) 100 (5) kHz
Notes to Table 3–17:
(1) This design is a binary loadable up counter.
(2) This design is configured for read-only operation in Extended mode. Read and write ability increases the number of logic elements (LEs) used.
(3) This design is configured for read-only operation. Read and write ability increases the number of LEs used.
(4) This design is asynchronous.
(5) The I2C megafunction is verified in hardware up to 100-kHz serial clock line rate.
Table 3–17. Device Performance for MAX V Devices (Part 2 of 2)
Resource
Used
Design Size and
Function
Resources Used
Performance
Unit
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Mode LEs UFM
Blocks C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Table 3–18. LE Internal Timing Microparameters for MAX V Devices (Part 1 of 2)
Symbol Parameter
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
tLUT
LE combinational look-up
table (LUT) delay 1,215 2,247 742 914 ps
tCOMB Combinational path delay 243 309 192 236 ps
tCLR LE register clear delay 401 545 309 381 ps
tPRE LE register preset delay 401 545 309 381 ps
tSU
LE register setup time
before clock 260 321 271 333 ps
tH
LE register hold time
after clock 0 —0 —0 —0 ps
tCO
LE register
clock-to-output delay 380 494 305 376 ps
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–13
Timing Model and Specifications
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
tCLKHL
Minimum clock high or
low time 253 339 216 266 ps
tCRegister control delay 1,356 1,741 1,114 1,372 ps
Table 3–18. LE Internal Timing Microparameters for MAX V Devices (Part 2 of 2)
Symbol Parameter
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
Table 3–19. IOE Internal Timing Microparameters for MAX V Devices
Symbol Parameter
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
tFASTIO
Data output delay from
adjacent LE to I/O block 170 428 207 254 ps
tIN
I/O input pad and buffer
delay 907 986 920 1,132 ps
tGLOB (1)
I/O input pad and buffer
delay used as global
signal pin
2,261 3,322 1,974 2,430 ps
tIOE
Internally generated
output enable delay 530 1,410 374 460 ps
tDL Input routing delay 318 509 291 358 ps
tOD (2) Output delay buffer and
pad delay 1,319 1,543 1,383 1,702 ps
tXZ (3) Output buffer disable
delay 1,045 1,276 982 1,209 ps
tZX (4) Output buffer enable
delay 1,160 1,353 1,303 1,604 ps
Notes to Table 3–19:
(1) Delay numbers for tGLOB differ for each device density and speed grade. The delay numbers for tGLOB, shown in Table 3–19, are based on a 5M240Z
device target.
(2) For more information about delay adders associated with different I/O standards, drive strengths, and slew rates, refer to Table 3–34 on page 3–
24 and Table 3–35 on page 3–25.
(3) For more information about tXZ delay adders associated with different I/O standards, drive strengths, and slew rates, refer to Table 3–22 on page 3–
15 and Table 3–23 on page 3–15.
(4) For more information about tZX delay adders associated with different I/O standards, drive strengths, and slew rates, refer to Table 3–20 on page 3–
14 and Table 3–21 on page 3–14.
3–14 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Timing Model and Specifications
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
Table 3–20 through Table 3–23 list the adder delays for tZX and tXZ microparameters
when using an I/O standard other than 3.3-V LVTTL with 16 mA drive strength.
Table 3–20. tZX IOE Microparameter Adders for Fast Slew Rate for MAX V Devices
Standard
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
3.3-V LVTTL 16 mA —0 —0 —0 —0 ps
8 mA 72 74 101 125 ps
3.3-V LVCMOS 8 mA —0 —0 —0 —0 ps
4 mA 72 74 101 125 ps
2.5-V LVTTL /
LVCMOS
14 mA 126 127 155 191 ps
7 mA 196 197 545 671 ps
1.8-V LVTTL /
LVCMOS
6 mA 608 610 721 888 ps
3 mA 681 685 2012 2477 ps
1.5-V LVCMOS 4 mA 1162 1157 1590 1957 ps
2 mA 1245 1244 3269 4024 ps
1.2-V LVCMOS 3 mA 1889 1856 2860 3520 ps
3.3-V PCI 20 mA 72 74 –18 –22 ps
LVDS — 126 — 127 — 155 — 191 ps
RSDS — 126 — 127 — 155 — 191 ps
Table 3–21. tZX IOE Microparameter Adders for Slow Slew Rate for MAX V Devices
Standard
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
3.3-V LVTTL 16 mA 5,951 6,063 6,012 5,743 ps
8 mA 6,534 6,662 8,785 8,516 ps
3.3-V LVCMOS 8 mA 5,951 6,063 6,012 5,743 ps
4 mA 6,534 6,662 8,785 8,516 ps
2.5-V LVTTL /
LVCMOS
14 mA 9,110 9,237 10,072 9,803 ps
7 mA 9,830 9,977 12,945 12,676 ps
1.8-V LVTTL /
LVCMOS
6 mA 21,800 21,787 21,185 20,916 ps
3 mA 23,020 23,037 24,597 24,328 ps
1.5-V LVCMOS 4 mA 39,120 39,067 34,517 34,248 ps
2 mA 40,670 40,617 39,717 39,448 ps
1.2-V LVCMOS 3 mA 69,505 70,461 55,800 55,531 ps
3.3-V PCI 20 mA 6,534 6,662 35 44 ps
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–15
Timing Model and Specifications
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Table 3–22. tXZ IOE Microparameter Adders for Fast Slew Rate for MAX V Devices
Standard
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
3.3-V LVTTL 16 mA—0—0—0—0 ps
8 mA –69 –69 74 –91 ps
3.3-V LVCMOS 8 mA—0—0—0—0 ps
4 mA –69 –69 –74 –91 ps
2.5-V LVTTL /
LVCMOS
14 mA –7 –10 –46 –56 ps
7 mA –66 –69 –82 –101 ps
1.8-V LVTTL /
LVCMOS
6 mA—45—37—–7—–8 ps
3 mA 34 25 119 147 ps
1.5-V LVCMOS 4 mA 166 155 339 418 ps
2 mA 190 179 464 571 ps
1.2-V LVCMOS 3 mA 300 283 817 1,006 ps
3.3-V PCI 20 mA –69 –69 80 99 ps
LVDS –7 — –10 — –46 — –56 ps
RSDS –7 — –10 — –46 — –56 ps
Table 3–23. tXZ IOE Microparameter Adders for Slow Slew Rate for MAX V Devices
Standard
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
3.3-V LVTTL 16 mA 171 174 73 –132 ps
8 mA 112 116 758 553 ps
3.3-V LVCMOS 8 mA 171 174 73 –132 ps
4 mA 112 116 758 553 ps
2.5-V LVTTL /
LVCMOS
14 mA 213 213 32 –173 ps
7 mA 166 166 714 509 ps
1.8-V LVTTL /
LVCMOS
6 mA 441 438 96 –109 ps
3 mA 496 494 963 758 ps
1.5-V LVCMOS 4 mA 765 755 238 33 ps
2 mA 903 897 1,319 1,114 ps
1.2-V LVCMOS 3 mA 1,159 1,130 400 195 ps
3.3-V PCI 20 mA 112 116 303 373 ps
3–16 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Timing Model and Specifications
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
1The default slew rate setting for MAX V devices in the Quartus II design software is
“fast”.
Table 3–24. UFM Block Internal Timing Microparameters for MAX V Devices (Part 1 of 2)
Symbol Parameter
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
tACLK
Address register clock
period 100 — 100 — 100 — 100 — ns
tASU
Address register shift
signal setup to address
register clock
20—20—20—20—ns
tAH
Address register shift
signal hold to address
register clock
20—20—20—20—ns
tADS
Address register data in
setup to address register
clock
20—20—20—20—ns
tADH
Address register data in
hold from address
register clock
20—20—20—20—ns
tDCLK Data register clock period 100 100 100 100 ns
tDSS
Data register shift signal
setup to data register
clock
60—60—60—60—ns
tDSH
Data register shift signal
hold from data register
clock
20—20—20—20—ns
tDDS
Data register data in
setup to data register
clock
20—20—20—20—ns
tDDH
Data register data in hold
from data register clock 20—20—20—20—ns
tDP
Program signal to data
clock hold time 0—0—0—0—ns
tPB
Maximum delay between
program rising edge to
UFM
busy
signal rising
edge
— 960 — 960 — 960 — 960 ns
tBP
Minimum delay allowed
from UFM
busy
signal
going low to program
signal going low
20—20—20—20—ns
tPPMX
Maximum length of
busy
pulse during a program — 100 — 100 — 100 — 100 µs
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–17
Timing Model and Specifications
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
tAE
Minimum
erase
signal
to address clock hold
time
0—0—0—0ns
tEB
Maximum delay between
the
erase
rising edge to
the UFM
busy
signal
rising edge
— 960 — 960 — 960 — 960 ns
tBE
Minimum delay allowed
from the UFM
busy
signal going low to
erase
signal going low
20—20—20—20—ns
tEPMX
Maximum length of
busy
pulse during an erase — 500 — 500 — 500 — 500 ms
tDCO
Delay from data register
clock to data register
output
—5—5—5—5ns
tOE
Delay from
OSC_ENA
signal reaching UFM to
rising clock of
OSC
leaving the UFM
180 — 180 — 180 — 180 — ns
tRA
Maximum read access
time —65—65—65—65ns
tOSCS
Maximum delay between
the
OSC_ENA
rising edge
to the
erase/program
signal rising edge
250 — 250 — 250 — 250 — ns
tOSCH
Minimum delay allowed
from the
erase/program
signal
going low to
OSC_ENA
signal going low
250 — 250 — 250 — 250 — ns
Table 3–24. UFM Block Internal Timing Microparameters for MAX V Devices (Part 2 of 2)
Symbol Parameter
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
3–18 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Timing Model and Specifications
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
Figure 3–3 through Figure 3–5 show the read, program, and erase waveforms for
UFM block timing parameters listed in Table 3–24.
Figure 3–3. UFM Read Waveform
t
DCO
t
DCLK
t
DSS
t
DSH
t
ADH
t
ADS
t
ASU
t
ACLK
t
AH
ARShft
ARClk
ARDin
DRShft
DRClk
DRDin
DRDout
Program
Erase
Busy
16 Data Bits
9 Address Bits
OSC_ENA
Figure 3–4. UFM Program Waveform
t
ADS
t
ASU
t
ACLK
t
ADH
t
AH
t
DDS
t
DCLK
t
DSS
t
DSH
t
DDH
t
PB
t
BP
t
PPMX
t
OSCS
t
OSCH
ARShft
ARClk
ARDin
DRShft
DRClk
DRDin
DRDout
Program
Erase
Busy
16 Data Bits
9 Address Bits
OSC_ENA
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–19
Timing Model and Specifications
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
External Timing Parameters
External timing parameters are specified by device density and speed grade. All
external I/O timing parameters shown are for the 3.3-V LVTTL I/O standard with the
maximum drive strength and fast slew rate. For external I/O timing using standards
other than LVTTL or for different drive strengths, use the I/O standard input and
output delay adders in Table 3–32 on page 3–23 through Table 3–36 on page 3–25.
fFor more information about each external timing parameters symbol, refer to
AN629: Understanding Timing in Altera CPLDs.
Figure 3–5. UFM Erase Waveform
ARShft
ARClk
ARDin
DRShft
DRClk
DRDin
DRDout
Program
Erase
Busy
9 Address Bits
tASU tACLK tAH
tADH
tADS
tEB
tEPMX
tOSCS tOSCH
OSC_ENA
tBE
Table 3–25. Routing Delay Internal Timing Microparameters for MAX V Devices
Routing
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
tC4 — 860 — 1,973 — 561 — 690 ps
tR4 — 655 — 1,479 — 445 — 548 ps
tLOCAL — 1,143 — 2,947 — 731 899 ps
3–20 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Timing Model and Specifications
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
Table 3–26 lists the external I/O timing parameters for the 5M40Z, 5M80Z, 5M160Z,
and 5M240Z devices.
Table 3–27 lists the external I/O timing parameters for the T144 package of the
5M240Z device.
Table 3–26. Global Clock External I/O Timing Parameters for the 5M40Z, 5M80Z, 5M160Z, and 5M240Z Devices
(Note 1), (2)
Symbol Parameter Condition
C4 C5, I5
Unit
Min Max Min Max
tPD1 Worst case pin-to-pin delay through one LUT 10 pF 7.9 14.0 ns
tPD2 Best case pin-to-pin delay through one LUT 10 pF 5.8 8.5 ns
tSU Global clock setup time 2.4 4.6 ns
tHGlobal clock hold time 0 0 ns
tCO Global clock to output delay 10 pF 2.0 6.6 2.0 8.6 ns
tCH Global clock high time 253 339 ps
tCL Global clock low time 253 339 ps
tCNT
Minimum global clock period for
16-bit counter — 5.4—8.4—ns
fCNT
Maximum global clock frequency for 16-bit
counter — 184.1 — 118.3 MHz
Notes to Table 3–26:
(1) The maximum frequency is limited by the I/O standard on the clock input pin. The 16-bit counter critical delay performs faster than this global
clock input pin maximum frequency.
(2) Not applicable to the T144 package of the 5M240Z device.
Table 3–27. Global Clock External I/O Timing Parameters for the 5M240Z Device (Note 1), (2)
Symbol Parameter Condition
C4 C5, I5
Unit
Min Max Min Max
tPD1 Worst case pin-to-pin delay through one LUT 10 pF 9.5 17.7 ns
tPD2 Best case pin-to-pin delay through one LUT 10 pF 5.7 8.5 ns
tSU Global clock setup time 2.2 4.4 ns
tHGlobal clock hold time 0 0 ns
tCO Global clock to output delay 10 pF 2.0 6.7 2.0 8.7 ns
tCH Global clock high time 253 339 ps
tCL Global clock low time 253 339 ps
tCNT
Minimum global clock period for 16-bit
counter — 5.4—8.4—ns
fCNT
Maximum global clock frequency for 16-bit
counter — 184.1 — 118.3 MHz
Notes to Table 3–27:
(1) The maximum frequency is limited by the I/O standard on the clock input pin. The 16-bit counter critical delay performs faster than this global
clock input pin maximum frequency.
(2) Only applicable to the T144 package of the 5M240Z device.
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–21
Timing Model and Specifications
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Table 3–28 lists the external I/O timing parameters for the 5M570Z device.
Table 3–29 lists the external I/O timing parameters for the 5M1270Z device.
Table 3–28. Global Clock External I/O Timing Parameters for the 5M570Z Device (Note 1)
Symbol Parameter Condition
C4 C5, I5
Unit
Min Max Min Max
tPD1 Worst case pin-to-pin delay through one LUT 10 pF 9.5 17.7 ns
tPD2 Best case pin-to-pin delay through one LUT 10 pF 5.7 8.5 ns
tSU Global clock setup time 2.2 4.4 ns
tHGlobal clock hold time 0 0 ns
tCO Global clock to output delay 10 pF 2.0 6.7 2.0 8.7 ns
tCH Global clock high time 253 339 ps
tCL Global clock low time 253 339 ps
tCNT
Minimum global clock period for 16-bit
counter — 5.4—8.4—ns
fCNT
Maximum global clock frequency for 16-bit
counter — 184.1 — 118.3 MHz
Note to Table 3–28:
(1) The maximum frequency is limited by the I/O standard on the clock input pin. The 16-bit counter critical delay performs faster than this global
clock input pin maximum frequency.
Table 3–29. Global Clock External I/O Timing Parameters for the 5M1270Z Device (Note 1), (2)
Symbol Parameter Condition
C4 C5, I5
Unit
Min Max Min Max
tPD1 Worst case pin-to-pin delay through one LUT 10 pF 8.1 10.0 ns
tPD2 Best case pin-to-pin delay through one LUT 10 pF 4.8 5.9 ns
tSU Global clock setup time 1.5 1.9 ns
tHGlobal clock hold time 0—0—ns
tCO Global clock to output delay 10 pF 2.0 5.9 2.0 7.3 ns
tCH Global clock high time 216 266 ps
tCL Global clock low time 216 266 ps
tCNT
Minimum global clock period for 16-bit
counter — 4.0—5.0—ns
fCNT
Maximum global clock frequency for 16-bit
counter — 247.5 — 201.1 MHz
Notes to Table 3–29:
(1) The maximum frequency is limited by the I/O standard on the clock input pin. The 16-bit counter critical delay performs faster than this global
clock input pin maximum frequency.
(2) Not applicable to the F324 package of the 5M1270Z device.
3–22 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Timing Model and Specifications
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
Table 3–30 lists the external I/O timing parameters for the F324 package of the
5M1270Z device.
Table 3–31 lists the external I/O timing parameters for the 5M2210Z device.
Table 3–30. Global Clock External I/O Timing Parameters for the 5M1270Z Device (Note 1), (2)
Symbol Parameter Condition
C4 C5, I5
Unit
Min Max Min Max
tPD1 Worst case pin-to-pin delay through one LUT 10 pF 9.1 11.2 ns
tPD2 Best case pin-to-pin delay through one LUT 10 pF 4.8 5.9 ns
tSU Global clock setup time 1.5 1.9 ns
tHGlobal clock hold time 0—0—ns
tCO Global clock to output delay 10 pF 2.0 6.0 2.0 7.4 ns
tCH Global clock high time 216 266 ps
tCL Global clock low time 216 266 ps
tCNT
Minimum global clock period for 16-bit
counter — 4.0—5.0—ns
fCNT
Maximum global clock frequency for 16-bit
counter — 247.5 — 201.1 MHz
Notes to Table 3–30:
(1) The maximum frequency is limited by the I/O standard on the clock input pin. The 16-bit counter critical delay performs faster than this global
clock input pin maximum frequency.
(2) Only applicable to the F324 package of the 5M1270Z device.
Table 3–31. Global Clock External I/O Timing Parameters for the 5M2210Z Device (Note 1)
Symbol Parameter Condition
C4 C5, I5
Unit
Min Max Min Max
tPD1 Worst case pin-to-pin delay through one LUT 10 pF 9.1 11.2 ns
tPD2 Best case pin-to-pin delay through one LUT 10 pF 4.8 5.9 ns
tSU Global clock setup time 1.5 1.9 ns
tHGlobal clock hold time 0—0—ns
tCO Global clock to output delay 10 pF 2.0 6.0 2.0 7.4 ns
tCH Global clock high time 216 266 ps
tCL Global clock low time 216 266 ps
tCNT
Minimum global clock period for 16-bit
counter — 4.0—5.0—ns
fCNT
Maximum global clock frequency for 16-bit
counter — 247.5 — 201.1 MHz
Note to Table 3–31:
(1) The maximum frequency is limited by the I/O standard on the clock input pin. The 16-bit counter critical delay performs faster than this global
clock input pin maximum frequency.
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–23
Timing Model and Specifications
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
External Timing I/O Delay Adders
The I/O delay timing parameters for the I/O standard input and output adders and
the input delays are specified by speed grade, independent of device density.
Table 3–32 through Table 3–36 on page 3–25 list the adder delays associated with I/O
pins for all packages. If you select an I/O standard other than 3.3-V LVTTL, add the
input delay adder to the external tSU timing parameters listed in Table 3–26 on page 3–
20 through Table 3–31. If you select an I/O standard other than 3.3-V LVTTL with
16 mA drive strength and fast slew rate, add the output delay adder to the external
tCO and tPD listed in Table 3–26 on page 3–20 through Table 3–31.
Table 3–32. External Timing Input Delay Adders for MAX V Devices
I/O Standard
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
3.3-V LVTTL
Without Schmitt
Trigger —0—0—0—0ps
With Schmitt
Trigger — 387 — 442 — 480 — 591 ps
3.3-V LVCMOS
Without Schmitt
Trigger —0—0—0—0ps
With Schmitt
Trigger — 387 — 442 — 480 — 591 ps
2.5-V LVTTL /
LVCMOS
Without Schmitt
Trigger — 42 — 42 — 246 303 ps
With Schmitt
Trigger — 429 — 483 — 787 — 968 ps
1.8-V LVTTL /
LVCMOS
Without Schmitt
Trigger — 378 — 368 — 695 — 855 ps
1.5-V LVCMOS Without Schmitt
Trigger — 681 — 658 — 1,334 1,642 ps
1.2-V LVCMOS Without Schmitt
Trigger — 1,055 — 1,010 — 2,324 — 2,860 ps
3.3-V PCI Without Schmitt
Trigger —0—0—0—0ps
Table 3–33. External Timing Input Delay tGLOB Adders for GCLK Pins for MAX V Devices (Part 1 of 2)
I/O Standard
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
3.3-V LVTTL
Without Schmitt
Trigger —0—0—0—0ps
With Schmitt
Trigger — 387 — 442 — 400 — 493 ps
3–24 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Timing Model and Specifications
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
3.3-V LVCMOS
Without Schmitt
Trigger —0—0—0—0ps
With Schmitt
Trigger — 387 — 442 — 400 — 493 ps
2.5-V LVTTL /
LVCMOS
Without Schmitt
Trigger — 242 — 242 — 287 — 353 ps
With Schmitt
Trigger — 429 — 483 — 550 — 677 ps
1.8-V LVTTL /
LVCMOS
Without Schmitt
Trigger — 378 — 368 — 459 — 565 ps
1.5-V LVCMOS Without Schmitt
Trigger — 681 — 658 — 1,111 1,368 ps
1.2-V LVCMOS Without Schmitt
Trigger — 1,055 — 1,010 — 2,067 — 2,544 ps
3.3-V PCI Without Schmitt
Trigger —0—0—7—9ps
Table 3–33. External Timing Input Delay tGLOB Adders for GCLK Pins for MAX V Devices (Part 2 of 2)
I/O Standard
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
Table 3–34. External Timing Output Delay and tOD Adders for Fast Slew Rate for MAX V Devices
I/O Standard
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
3.3-V LVTTL 16 mA—0—0—0—0ps
8 mA—39—58—84—104ps
3.3-V LVCMOS 8 mA—0—0—0—0ps
4 mA—39—58—84—104ps
2.5-V LVTTL / LVCMOS 14 mA 122 129 158 195 ps
7 mA 196 188 251 309 ps
1.8-V LVTTL / LVCMOS 6 mA 624 624 738 909 ps
3 mA 686 694 850 1,046 ps
1.5-V LVCMOS 4 mA 1,188 1,184 1,376 1,694 ps
2 mA 1,279 1,280 1,517 1,867 ps
1.2-V LVCMOS 3 mA 1,911 1,883 2,206 2,715 ps
3.3-V PCI 20 mA 39 58 4 5 ps
LVDS — 122 — 129 — 158 — 195 ps
RSDS — 122 — 129 — 158 — 195 ps
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–25
Timing Model and Specifications
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Table 3–35. External Timing Output Delay and tOD Adders for Slow Slew Rate for MAX V Devices
I/O Standard
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
3.3-V LVTTL 16 mA 5,913 6,043 6,612 6,293 ps
8 mA 6,488 6,645 7,313 6,994 ps
3.3-V LVCMOS 8 mA 5,913 6,043 6,612 6,293 ps
4 mA 6,488 6,645 7,313 6,994 ps
2.5-V LVTTL / LVCMOS 14 mA 9,088 9,222 10,021 9,702 ps
7 mA 9,808 9,962 10,881 10,562 ps
1.8-V LVTTL / LVCMOS 6 mA 21,758 21,782 21,134 20,815 ps
3 mA 23,028 23,032 22,399 22,080 ps
1.5-V LVCMOS 4 mA 39,068 39,032 34,499 34,180 ps
2 mA 40,578 40,542 36,281 35,962 ps
1.2-V LVCMOS 3 mA 69,332 70,257 55,796 55,477 ps
3.3-V PCI 20 mA 6,488 6,645 339 418 ps
Table 3–36. IOE Programmable Delays for MAX V Devices
Parameter
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z 5M1270Z/ 5M2210Z
Unit
C4 C5, I5 C4 C5, I5
Min Max Min Max Min Max Min Max
Input Delay from Pin to Internal
Cells = 1 — 1,858 — 2,214 — 1,592 — 1,960 ps
Input Delay from Pin to Internal
Cells = 0 — 569 — 616 — 115 — 142 ps
3–26 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Timing Model and Specifications
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
Maximum Input and Output Clock Rates
Table 3–37 and Table 3–38 list the maximum input and output clock rates for standard
I/O pins in MAX V devices.
Table 3–37. Maximum Input Clock Rate for I/Os for MAX V Devices
I/O Standard
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z/5M1270Z/
5M2210Z Unit
C4, C5, I5
3.3-V LVTTL Without Schmitt Trigger 304 MHz
With Schmitt Trigger 304 MHz
3.3-V LVCMOS Without Schmitt Trigger 304 MHz
With Schmitt Trigger 304 MHz
2.5-V LVTTL Without Schmitt Trigger 304 MHz
With Schmitt Trigger 304 MHz
2.5-V LVCMOS Without Schmitt Trigger 304 MHz
With Schmitt Trigger 304 MHz
1.8-V LVTTL Without Schmitt Trigger 200 MHz
1.8-V LVCMOS Without Schmitt Trigger 200 MHz
1.5-V LVCMOS Without Schmitt Trigger 150 MHz
1.2-V LVCMOS Without Schmitt Trigger 120 MHz
3.3-V PCI Without Schmitt Trigger 304 MHz
Table 3–38. Maximum Output Clock Rate for I/Os for MAX V Devices
I/O Standard
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z/5M1270Z/
5M2210Z Unit
C4, C5, I5
3.3-V LVTTL 304 MHz
3.3-V LVCMOS 304 MHz
2.5-V LVTTL 304 MHz
2.5-V LVCMOS 304 MHz
1.8-V LVTTL 200 MHz
1.8-V LVCMOS 200 MHz
1.5-V LVCMOS 150 MHz
1.2-V LVCMOS 120 MHz
3.3-V PCI 304 MHz
LVDS 304 MHz
RSDS 200 MHz
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–27
Timing Model and Specifications
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
LVDS and RSDS Output Timing Specifications
Table 3–39 lists the emulated LVDS output timing specifications for MAX V devices.
Table 3–39. Emulated LVDS Output Timing Specifications for MAX V Devices
Parameter Mode
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z/5M1270Z/
5M2210Z Unit
C4, C5, I5
Min Max
Data rate (1), (2)
10 304 Mbps
9 304 Mbps
8 304 Mbps
7 304 Mbps
6 304 Mbps
5 304 Mbps
4 304 Mbps
3 304 Mbps
2 304 Mbps
1 304 Mbps
tDUTY —4555%
Total jitter (3) 0.2 UI
tRISE 450 ps
tFALL 450 ps
Notes to Table 3–39:
(1) The performance of the LVDS_E_3R transmitter system is limited by the lower of the two—the maximum data rate supported by LVDS_E_3R
I/O buffer or 2x (FMAX of the ALTLVDS_TX instance). The actual performance of your LVDS_E_3R transmitter system must be attained through
the Quartus II timing analysis of the complete design.
(2) For the input clock pin to achieve 304 Mbps, use I/O standard with VCCIO of 2.5 V and above.
(3) This specification is based on external clean clock source.
3–28 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Timing Model and Specifications
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
Table 3–40 lists the emulated RSDS output timing specifications for MAX V devices.
Table 3–40. Emulated RSDS Output Timing Specifications for MAX V Devices
Parameter Mode
5M40Z/ 5M80Z/ 5M160Z/
5M240Z/ 5M570Z/5M1270Z/
5M2210Z Unit
C4, C5, I5
Min Max
Data rate (1)
10 200 Mbps
9 200 Mbps
8 200 Mbps
7 200 Mbps
6 200 Mbps
5 200 Mbps
4 200 Mbps
3 200 Mbps
2 200 Mbps
1 200 Mbps
tDUTY —4555%
Total jitter (2) 0.2 UI
tRISE 450 ps
tFALL 450 ps
Notes to Table 3–40:
(1) For the input clock pin to achieve 200 Mbps, use I/O standard with VCCIO of 1.8 V and above.
(2) This specification is based on external clean clock source.
Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices 3–29
Timing Model and Specifications
May 2011 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
JTAG Timing Specifications
Figure 3–6 shows the timing waveform for the JTAG signals for the MAX V device
family.
Table 3–41 lists the JTAG timing parameters and values for the MAX V device family.
Figure 3–6. JTAG Timing Waveform for MAX V Devices
TDI
TMS
TDO
TCK
Signal
to be
Captured
Signal
to be
Driven
tJCP
tJCH tJCL
tJPSU tJPH
tJPCO tJPXZ
tJPZX
tJSSU tJSH
tJSZX tJSCO tJSXZ
Table 3–41. JTAG Timing Parameters for MAX V Devices (Part 1 of 2)
Symbol Parameter Min Max Unit
tJCP (1)
TCK
clock period for VCCIO1 =3.3 V 55.5 ns
TCK
clock period for VCCIO1 =2.5 V 62.5 ns
TCK
clock period for VCCIO1 = 1.8 V 100 ns
TCK
clock period for VCCIO1 = 1.5 V 143 ns
tJCH
TCK
clock high time 20 ns
tJCL
TCK
clock low time 20 ns
tJPSU JTAG port setup time (2) 8—ns
tJPH JTAG port hold time 10 ns
tJPCO JTAG port clock to output (2) —15ns
tJPZX JTAG port high impedance to valid output (2) —15ns
tJPXZ JTAG port valid output to high impedance (2) —15ns
tJSSU Capture register setup time 8 ns
tJSH Capture register hold time 10 ns
tJSCO Update register clock to output 25 ns
tJSZX Update register high impedance to valid output 25 ns
3–30 Chapter 3: DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices
Document Revision History
MAX V Device Handbook May 2011 Altera Corporation
Document Revision History
Table 3–42 lists the revision history for this chapter.
tJSXZ Update register valid output to high impedance 25 ns
Notes to Table 3–41:
(1) Minimum clock period specified for 10 pF load on the
TDO
pin. Larger loads on
TDO
degrades the maximum
TCK
frequency.
(2) This specification is shown for 3.3-V LVTTL/LVCMOS and 2.5-V LVTTL/LVCMOS operation of the JTAG pins. For 1.8-V LVTTL/LVCMOS and
1.5-V LVCMOS operation, the tJPSU minimum is 6 ns and tJPCO, tJPZX, and tJPXZ are maximum values at 35 ns.
Table 3–41. JTAG Timing Parameters for MAX V Devices (Part 2 of 2)
Symbol Parameter Min Max Unit
Table 3–42. Document Revision History
Date Version Changes
May 2011 1.2 Updated Table 3–2, Table 3–15, Table 3–16, and Table 3–33.
January 2011 1.1 Updated Table 3–37, Table 3–38, Table 3–39, and Table 3–40.
December 2010 1.0 Initial release.
June 2017 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Section II. System Integration in MAX V
Devices
This section provides information about system integration in MAX®V devices.
This section includes the following chapters:
Chapter 4, Hot Socketing and Power-On Reset in MAX V Devices
Chapter 5, Using MAX V Devices in Multi-Voltage Systems
Chapter 6, JTAG and In-System Programmability in MAX V Devices
Chapter 7, User Flash Memory in MAX V Devices
Chapter 8, JTAG Boundary-Scan Testing in MAX V Devices
II–2 Section II: System Integration in MAX V Devices
MAX V Device Handbook June 2017 Altera Corporation
MAX V Device Handbook
December 2010
MV51004-1.0
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© 2010 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, HARDCOPY, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX are Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off.
and/or trademarks of Altera Corporation in the U.S. and other countries. All other trademarks and service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at
www.altera.com/common/legal.html. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera’s standard warranty, but
reserves the right to make changes to any products and services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any
information, product, or service described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device
specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.
4. Hot Socketing and Power-On Reset in
MAX V Devices
This chapter provides information about hot-socketing specifications, power-on reset
(POR) requirements, and their implementation in MAXV devices.
MAX V devices offer hot socketing, also known as hot plug-in or hot swap, and
power sequencing support. You can insert or remove a MAX V device in a system
during system operation without causing undesirable effects to the running system
bus. The hot-socketing feature removes some of the difficulty when using MAX V
devices on PCBs that contain a mixture of 3.3-, 2.5-, 1.8-, and 1.5-V devices.
The MAX V hot-socketing feature provides the following:
Board or device insertion and removal
Support for any power-up sequence
Non-intrusive I/O buffers to system buses during hot insertion
This chapter contains the following sections:
“MAX V Hot-Socketing Specifications” on page 4–1
“Hot-Socketing Feature Implementation in MAX V Devices” on page 4–3
“Power-On Reset Circuitry” on page 4–5
MAX V Hot-Socketing Specifications
MAX V devices offer the hot-socketing feature without the need for external
components or special design requirements. The advantages of hot-socketing support
in MAX V devices includes the following:
The device can be driven before and during power up or power down without
damaging the device.
I/O pins remain tri-stated during power up. The device does not drive out before
or during power up, thereby affecting other operating buses.
Signal pins do not drive the VCCIO or VCCINT power supplies. External input signals
to the device I/O pins do not power the device VCCIO or VCCINT power supplies
using internal paths. This is true if the VCCINT and VCCIO power supplies are held at
GND.
1Altera uses GND as a reference for the hot-socketing and I/O buffers circuitry
designs. To ensure device reliability and compliance to the hot-socketing
specifications, you must connect GND between boards before connecting the VCCINT
and VCCIO power supplies.
December 2010
MV51004-1.0
4–2 Chapter 4: Hot Socketing and Power-On Reset in MAX V Devices
MAX V Hot-Socketing Specifications
MAX V Device Handbook December 2010 Altera Corporation
Devices Can Be Driven Before Power Up
You can drive signals into the I/O pins and
GCLK[3..0]
pins of MAX V devices before
or during power up or power down without damaging the device. To simplify the
system-level design, MAX V devices support any power-up or power-down sequence
(VCCIO1, VCCIO2, VCCIO3, VCCIO4, and VCCINT).
I/O Pins Remain Tri-Stated During Power Up
A device that does not support hot socketing may interrupt system operation or cause
contention by driving out before or during power up. In a hot-socketing situation, the
MAX V device’s output buffers are turned off during system power up. MAX V
devices do not drive out until the device attains proper operating conditions and is
fully configured. For more information about turn-on voltages, refer to “Power-On
Reset Circuitry” on page 4–5.
Signal Pins Do Not Drive the VCCIO or VCCINT Power Supplies
MAX V devices do not have a current path from the I/O pins or
GCLK[3..0]
pins to
the VCCIO or VCCINT power supplies before or during power up. A MAX V device may
be inserted into (or removed from) a system board that is powered up without
damaging or interfering with system-board operation. When hot socketing, MAX V
devices may have a minimal effect on the signal integrity of the backplane.
AC and DC Specifications
You can power up or power down the VCCIO and VCCINT power supplies in any
sequence. During hot socketing, the I/O pin capacitance is less than 8 pF. MAX V
devices meet the following hot-socketing specifications:
DC specification: | IIOPIN | < 300 A.
AC specification: | IIOPIN | < 8 mA for 10 ns or less.
1MAX V devices are immune to latch-up when hot socketing. If the
TCK
JTAG input pin
is driven high during hot socketing, the current on that pin might exceed the
specifications listed above.
IIOPIN is the current for any user I/O pin on the device. The AC specification applies
when the device is being powered up or powered down. This specification takes into
account the pin capacitance but not the board trace and external loading capacitance.
You must consider additional capacitance for trace, connector, and loading separately.
The peak current duration due to power-up transients is 10 ns or less.
The DC specification applies when all VCC supplies to the device are stable in the
powered-up or powered-down conditions.
Chapter 4: Hot Socketing and Power-On Reset in MAX V Devices 4–3
Hot-Socketing Feature Implementation in MAX V Devices
December 2010 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
Hot-Socketing Feature Implementation in MAX V Devices
The hot-socketing feature tri-states the output buffer during the power-up event
(either the VCCINT or VCCIO power supplies) or power-down event. The hot-socketing
circuitry generates an internal
HOTSCKT
signal when either VCCINT or VCCIO is below
the threshold voltage during power up or power down. The
HOTSCKT
signal cuts off
the output buffer to ensure that no DC current leaks through the pin (except for weak
pull-up leaking). When VCC ramps up very slowly during power up, VCC may still be
relatively low even after the POR signal is released and device configuration is
complete.
1Ensure that VCCINT is within the recommended operating range even though SRAM
download has completed.
Figure 4–1 shows the circuitry for each I/O and clock pin.
The POR circuit monitors the VCCINT and VCCIO voltage levels and keeps the I/O pins
tri-stated until the device has completed its flash memory configuration of the SRAM
logic. The weak pull-up resistor (R) from the I/O pin to VCCIO is enabled during
download to keep the I/O pins from floating. The 3.3-V tolerance control circuit
permits the I/O pins to be driven by 3.3 V before VCCIO and/or VCCINT are powered,
and it prevents the I/O pins from driving out when the device is not fully powered or
operational. The hot-socketing circuitry prevents the I/O pins from internally
powering VCCIO and VCCINT when driven by external signals before the device is
powered.
fFor more information about the 5.0-V tolerance, refer to the Using MAX V Devices in
Multi-Voltage Systems chapter.
Figure 4–1. Hot-Socketing Circuitry for MAX V Devices
Output Enable
VCCIO
Hot Socket
Voltage
Tolerance
Control
Power On
Reset
Monitor
Weak
Pull-Up
Resistor
PAD
Input Buffer
to Logic Array
4–4 Chapter 4: Hot Socketing and Power-On Reset in MAX V Devices
Hot-Socketing Feature Implementation in MAX V Devices
MAX V Device Handbook December 2010 Altera Corporation
Figure 4–2 shows a transistor-level cross section of the MAX V device I/O buffers.
This design ensures that the output buffers do not drive when VCCIO is powered
before VCCINT or if the I/O pad voltage is higher than VCCIO. This also applies for
sudden voltage spikes during hot insertion. The VPAD leakage current charges the
3.3-V tolerant circuit capacitance.
The CMOS output drivers in the I/O pins intrinsically provide electrostatic discharge
(ESD) protection. There are two cases to consider for ESD voltage strikes—positive
voltage zap and negative voltage zap.
A positive ESD voltage zap occurs when a positive voltage is present on an I/O pin
due to an ESD charge event. This can cause the N+ (Drain)/ P-Substrate junction of
the N-channel drain to break down and the N+ (Drain)/P-Substrate/N+ (Source)
intrinsic bipolar transistor turn on to discharge ESD current from I/O pin to GND.
The dashed line in Figure 4–3 shows the ESD current discharge path during a positive
ESD zap.
Figure 4–2. Transistor-Level I/O Buffers for MAX V Devices
p - substrate
p+
p+
n - well
n+
VCCIO
n+
n+
p - well
IOE Signal
VPAD
IOE Signal or the
Larger of VCCIO or VPAD
The Larger of
VCCIO or VPAD
Ensures 3.3-V
Tolerance and
Hot-Socket
Protection
Figure 4–3. ESD Protection During Positive Voltage Zap
I/O
I/O
Gate
Gate
Drain
Drain
PMOS
NMOS
Source
Source
GND GND
N+
N+
P-Substrate G
S
D
Chapter 4: Hot Socketing and Power-On Reset in MAX V Devices 4–5
Power-On Reset Circuitry
December 2010 Altera Corporation MAX V Device Handbook
When the I/O pin receives a negative ESD zap at the pin that is less than –0.7 V (0.7 V
is the voltage drop across a diode), the intrinsic
P-Substrate/N+ drain diode is forward biased. Therefore, the discharge ESD current
path is from GND to the I/O pin, as shown in Figure 4–4.
Power-On Reset Circuitry
MAX V devices have POR circuits to monitor the VCCINT and VCCIO voltage levels
during power up. The POR circuit monitors these voltages, triggering download from
the non-volatile configuration flash memory block to the SRAM logic, maintaining the
tri-state of the I/O pins (with weak pull-up resistors enabled) before and during this
process. When the MAX V device enters user mode, the POR circuit releases the I/O
pins to user functionality. The POR circuit of the MAX V device does not monitor the
VCCINT voltage level after the device enters into user mode.
Power-Up Characteristics
When power is applied to a MAX V device, the POR circuit monitors VCCINT and
begins SRAM download at 1.55 V for MAX V devices. From this voltage reference, the
SRAM download and entry into user mode takes 200 to 450 µs maximum, depending
on your device density. This period of time is specified as tCONFIG in the power-up
timing section of the DC and Switching Characteristics for MAX V Devices chapter.
Entry into user mode is gated by whether all the VCCIO banks are powered with
sufficient operating voltage. If VCCINT and VCCIO are powered simultaneously, the
device enters user mode within the tCONFIG specifications. If VCCIO is powered more
than tCONFIG after VCCINT, the device does not enter user mode until 2 µs after all VCCIO
banks are powered.
Figure 4–4. ESD Protection During Negative Voltage Zap
I/O
I/O
Gate
Gate
Drain
Drain
PMOS
NMOS
Source
Source
GND GND
N+
N+
P-Substrate G
S
D
4–6 Chapter 4: Hot Socketing and Power-On Reset in MAX V Devices
Document Revision History
MAX V Device Handbook December 2010 Altera Corporation
For MAX V devices, the POR circuitry does not monitor the VCCINT and VCCIO voltage
levels after the device enters user mode. If there is a VCCINT voltage sag below 1.4 V
during user mode, the functionality of the device is not guaranteed and you must
power down VCCINT to 250 mV for a minimum of 10 µs before powering VCCINT and
VCCIO up again. After VCCINT rises from 250 mV back to approximately 1.55 V, the
SRAM download restarts and the device begins to operate after the tCONFIG time has
passed.
Figure 4–5 shows the voltages for POR of MAX V devices during power up into user
mode and from user mode to power down or brown out.
1All VCCINT and VCCIO power supplies of all banks must be powered on before entering
user mode.
1After SRAM configuration, all registers in the device are cleared and released into
user function before the I/O tri-states are released. To release clears after the tri-states
are released, use the
DEV_CLRn
pin option. To hold the tri-states beyond the power-up
configuration time, use the
DEV_OE
pin option.
Document Revision History
Table 4–1 lists the revision history for this chapter.
Figure 4–5. Power-Up Characteristics for MAX V Devices (Note 1), (2)
Notes to Figure 4–5:
(1) Time scale is relative.
(2) For this figure, all the VCCIO banks are powered up simultaneously with the VCCINT profile shown. If this is not the case, tCONFIG stretches out until all
VCCIO banks are powered.
3.3 V
1.55 V
Tri-State User Mode
Operation
250 mV
1.8 V
Tri-State
1.4 V
MAX V Device
Approximate Voltage
for SRAM Download Start
VCCINT must be powered down
to 250 mV if the VCCINT
dips below this level
tCONFIG
tCONFIG
User Mode
Operation
VCCINT
minimum 10
µs
Table 4–1. Document Revision History
Date Version Changes
December 2010 1.0 Initial release.
MAX V Device Handbook
June 2017
MV51005-2017.06.16
Subscribe
© 2017 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. ALTERA, ARRIA, CYCLONE, HARDCOPY, MAX, MEGACORE, NIOS, QUARTUS and STRATIX are Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off.
and/or trademarks of Altera Corporation in the U.S. and other countries. All other trademarks and service marks are the property of their respective holders as described at
www.altera.com/common/legal.html. Altera warrants performance of its semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera’s standard warranty, but
reserves the right to make changes to any produ