ANT-868-ID Datasheet

AniennaFactgr LInx fir A E
1 Revised 9/13/2017
Product Description
The ID Series, ½-wave center-fed Industrial Dipole
antenna is a weatherized design with industrial
and outdoor applications in mind, such as outdoor
meters, solar panel controls and other sensor
monitoring and control systems requiring a low
cost - but rugged - solution. The plastic and cable
are rated for a wide temperature range and UV
exposure for long term reliability.
Two standard cable lengths of 1m and 2m allow
the antenna to be remote mounted in a position to
achieve the best RF performance. An integrated
flange makes mounting the antenna simple.
ID Series antennas attach via a standard SMA
connector. Custom colors, cable lengths and
connectors are available for volume OEM
customers.
Features
• Weatherized assembly for outdoor installation
• UV protection
• IP-67 rating*
• Wide temperature range
• Small size
• Outstanding VSWR
• Integrated mounting flange
• Standard SMA connector
Electrical Specifications
Center Frequency: 868MHz
Recom. Freq. Range: 848–898MHz
Bandwidth: 50MHz
Wavelength: ½-wave
VSWR: 1.9 typical
Peak Gain: 0.6dBi max
Impedance: 50-ohms
Cable: 1 or 2m of RG-58/U
Connection: SMA
Oper. Temp. Range: –40°C to +80°C
UV Resistance: UL 2556 section 4.2.8.5
or equivalent
ANT-868-ID
Data Sheet by
Ø9.5 mm
(0.37")
109.6 mm
(4.31")
10.4 mm
(0.41")
Ø14.5 mm
(0.57")
22.7 mm
(0.90")
31.2 mm
(1.23")
15.0 mm
(0.59")
1.0 m
(39.4”)
or
2.0 m
(78.7”)
Ø3.2 mm
(0.13")
Ordering Information
ANT-868-ID-1000-SMA (1m with SMA connector)
ANT-868-ID-2000-SMA (2m with SMA connector)
MEC-PSA-ID (Optional PSA adhesive patch)
Contact Linx for custom cable lengths.
3.18 mm
(0.13")
11.9 mm
(0.47")
*The IP rating applies to the antenna body only. IP ratings on
the product’s enclosure depend on how the mating connector is
implemented.
AniennaFactor Lir'Ix
2
3:1
2:1
1:1
768MHz 868MHz 968MHz
V
SWR 1.087
25%
11%
0%
Reflected Power
VSWR Graph
What is VSWR?
The Voltage Standing Wave Ratio (VSWR) is a measurement of how well an antenna is matched to a source
impedance, typically 50-ohms. It is calculated by measuring the voltage wave that is headed toward the load
versus the voltage wave that is reflected back from the load. A perfect match has a VSWR of 1:1. The higher
the first number, the worse the match, and the more inefficient the system. Since a perfect match cannot
ever be obtained, some benchmark for performance needs to be set. In the case of antenna VSWR, this
is usually 2:1. At this point, 88.9% of the energy sent to the antenna by the transmitter is radiated into free
space and 11.1% is either reflected back into the source or lost as heat on the structure of the antenna. In
the other direction, 88.9% of the energy recovered by the antenna is transferred into the receiver. As a side
note, since the “:1” is always implied, many data sheets will remove it and just display the first number.
How to Read a VSWR Graph
VSWR is usually displayed graphically versus frequency. The lowest point on the graph is the antenna’s
operational center frequency. In most cases, this is different than the designed center frequency due to
fabrication tolerances. The VSWR at that point denotes how close to 50-ohms the antenna gets. Linx
specifies the recommended bandwidth as the range where the typical antenna VSWR is less than 2:1.
by
ANT-868-ID Data Sheet
AniennaFacggr
3
Copyright © 2017 Linx Technologies
159 Ort Lane, Merlin, OR 97532
Phone: +1 541 471 6256
Fax: +1 541 471 6251
www.linxtechnologies.com by
ANT-868-ID Data Sheet
About Gain Plots
The true measure of the effectiveness of an antenna in any given application is determined by the gain
and radiation pattern measurement. For antennas gain is typically measured relative to a perfect (isotropic)
radiator having the same source power as the antenna under test, the units of gain in this case will be
decibels isotropic (dBi). The radiation pattern is a graphical representation of signal strength measured at
fixed distance from the antenna.
Gain when applied to antennas is a measure of how the antenna radiates and focuses energy into free
space. Much like a flashlight focuses light from a bulb in a specific direction, antennas focus RF energy into
specific directions. Gain in this sense refers to an increase in energy in one direction over others.
It should also be understood that gain is not “free”, gain above 0dBi in one
direction means that there must be less gain in another direction. Pictorially
this can be pictured as shown in the figures to the right. The orange pattern
represents the radiation pattern for a perfect dipole antenna, which is shaped
like a donut. The pattern for an omnidirectional antenna with gain is shown in
blue. The gain antenna is able to work with a device located further from the
center along the axis of the pattern, but not with devices closer to the
center when they are off the axis – the donut has been squished.
Gain is also related to the overall physical size of the antenna, as well as
surrounding materials. As the geometry of the antenna is reduced below the effective wavelength (considered
an electrically small antenna) the gain decreases. Also, the relative distance between an electrically small
antenna and its associated ground impacts antenna gain.
Gain Plots
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XZ-Plane Gain YZ-Plane Gain XY-Plane Gain
E / Vertical Gain
H / Ho ri zontal Gain
Total Gain
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