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69651 Views 25 Replies Latest reply: Sep 6, 2012 8:48 AM by Andrew_Dreasler RSS
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Jun 26, 2012 12:04 PM

Death Ray at Hotel

The Vdara Hotel & Spa, a glass structure, famously sprung a death ray that would reflkedct the suns rays and was hot enough to singe hair or melt plastic. Apparently, intense heat is created by the curved glass surface of the hotel, which acts as a parabolic dish. The glass bounces the rays from the sun and concentrates the light in 10-by-15-foot hot zone on a portion of the pool deck.

 

How would you solve this issue? (or avoid it!)

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/39403349/ns/travel-news/t/death-ray-vegas-hotel-pool-heats-guests/#

  • MetMan Apprentice 93 posts since
    Oct 24, 2011
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 26, 2012 5:11 PM (in response to FilippelliEP)
    Death Ray at Hotel

    Sounds like a great place to get a tan! 

    • MetMan Apprentice 93 posts since
      Oct 24, 2011
      Currently Being Moderated
      Jun 27, 2012 10:07 AM (in response to FilippelliEP)
      Death Ray at Hotel

      On a more serious note...  there are quite a few things they could do.  Here are some quick ideas:

      • Coat the windows to reflect more light back up and let less intense light through.
      • Install retractable shutters or shades to provide shade during the hottest part of the day.
      • Hang shade cloth panels inside to defuse the sunlight. 
      • Even better, install a solar panel array to power the hotel 
  • basreflex Novice 3 posts since
    Aug 30, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 30, 2012 10:21 AM (in response to FilippelliEP)
    Death Ray at Hotel

    there are foils that act as fresnel lenses. these can be used to diverge the solar beam instead of the converging aciton of the glass.

    fresnel lenses are found in credit card size flat optical  magnifiers, but there is no objection to increase the size.

  • jsink2015 Novice 2 posts since
    Aug 30, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 30, 2012 11:48 AM (in response to FilippelliEP)
    Re: Death Ray at Hotel

    I have flat reflecting glass on my house. Not an issue

     

    For your curved surfaces, I would add difuser ribs to the windows to reflect the light in diferent directions to reduce the heat intensity.

  • phantomforcefield3sec Novice 1 posts since
    Aug 30, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 30, 2012 11:38 AM (in response to FilippelliEP)
    Death Ray at Hotel

    Paint or adhere photovoltaic material onto the affected areas and use the converted power to acivate a large LCD display.

    gb7

  • tedkub Novice 1 posts since
    Aug 30, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 30, 2012 11:59 AM (in response to FilippelliEP)
    Death Ray at Hotel

    Put a kinetic sculpture that takes advantage of the heat in the area.    It would improve the looks of the hotel and prevent people from walking there.

  • JustTim Novice 2 posts since
    Aug 30, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 30, 2012 12:00 PM (in response to FilippelliEP)
    Re: Death Ray at Hotel

    The first step would be to identify the area affected throughout the pool season. Next I would have structures built with a series of pleasant-looking reflective panels that would block the death ray throughout it's travels without blocking the sun from the pool area, if possible.

  • scotowennelson Novice 1 posts since
    Aug 30, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 30, 2012 12:31 PM (in response to FilippelliEP)
    Death Ray at Hotel

    Coat inside surface of curved glass with gold bearing tint. Outside view would be gold mirror while rejecting a lot of infrared from passing through.

  • Andrew_Dreasler Novice 6 posts since
    Aug 30, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 30, 2012 1:38 PM (in response to FilippelliEP)
    Death Ray at Hotel

    I'd say map out the travel of the hot spot over the course of one full year, then build a shallow pond covering that area and about 18 inches beyond it.  Plant shrubbery/place potted plants around the perimiter to keep idiots- er, guests from wandering into the deat ray's path and allow everyone to marvel at the new attraction, a water feature that spontaneously boils.  And if the pond dosen't get hot enough to boil, congradulations, you've successfully contained the rouge solar energy.

  • NEMOSHARK Novice 1 posts since
    Aug 30, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 30, 2012 1:51 PM (in response to FilippelliEP)
    Death Ray at Hotel

    A reasonably simple engineering solution would be to apply a circularly polarized film over the select area that is reflecting down to the pool area. As light passes through the polarized material it twists 90 degrees reflecting back from the already reflective glass out of phase, as it were. This then blocks the reflected light from affecting the pool area. A thin diffuse glass with an IR filter coating on its back side couldn’t hurt as it would protect the polarized film from the elements and further reduce the IR from being reflected. This is not new technology. Virtually every LCD screen uses this technology

    • Andrew_Dreasler Novice 6 posts since
      Aug 30, 2012
      Currently Being Moderated
      Aug 30, 2012 1:59 PM (in response to NEMOSHARK)
      Death Ray at Hotel

      Pardon me for being obtuse, but how does rotating the polarization 90 degrees help?  unless you're going to have another sheet of film over the pool to block the polarized light.  Or are we counting on the polarizing film absorming enough energy that the reflected light is too weak to be felt?

  • Leftie Novice 1 posts since
    Aug 22, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 30, 2012 6:16 PM (in response to FilippelliEP)
    Death Ray at Hotel

    1. Set up a solar collecting parasol, either hot water or solar electric.  The hot water can be used for the jacuzzi.

    2. Set up a Stirling Cycle engine to run a large fan or air conditioner, or the forementioned sculpture

    3. Paint the sidewalk with color changing liquid crystals so people can see the hot spot.

     

    Half kidding aside, as for eliminating the problem, that would take some modelling to show the position of the hot spot during different seasons of the year at different times of day.  The pattern may indicate when there is and when there is not a "problem".  Narrowing down the scope of the problem may help identify solutions.  It may only be practical to mitigate, not "solve" the problem...  Some of the "avoidance zone" solutions above are quite ingenius.

     

    Similar refractive devices in windows (fish bowls, decorative bottles, oil lamps) have been responsible for igniting fires.

  • GaryV Novice 8 posts since
    Jan 15, 2012
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 5, 2012 6:36 PM (in response to FilippelliEP)
    Death Ray at Hotel

    Have the engineer plot the points of convergence from each window.  Then decide on an acceptable wide area of convergence that spans perhaps the width of a building.  Calculate the degree angle for each window to hit the area so that no more than one or two windows hit the same spot.  Call back the window glaziers and have them reset each window to the 2 degrees of angular movement up/down, and left/right to match the engineers chart for each window.  This will diffuse the light, will not affect the view that the guest is paying for, and will still use the same window mount for the panes.  It shouldn't seriously affect the ability of the window washers to do their routine maintenance either.  The convergence calculation will have to run for a 4-year cycle I believe, to cover all the changing angles of sunlight.

    • Andrew_Dreasler Novice 6 posts since
      Aug 30, 2012
      Currently Being Moderated
      Sep 6, 2012 8:48 AM (in response to GaryV)
      Death Ray at Hotel

      Wow, I think that this is the first reply that seriously looks at eliminating the problem at the source instead of looking at ways to keep people from walking into the death ray's target zone or slapping coatings on the windows that would alter the guests' views outside.

       

      It also sounds hugely expensive. I never knew window glazers could work at that level of precision on a building, getting a window lined up to within a couple of degrees; that level of cratmanship isn't likely to come cheap.

      • GaryV Novice 8 posts since
        Jan 15, 2012
        Currently Being Moderated
        Sep 6, 2012 3:04 PM (in response to Andrew_Dreasler)
        Death Ray at Hotel

        I'm sorry, I meant that the 2 degrees of freedom are, #1, left-right, and #2, up/down, not, as it were, to hold the tilt to an accuracy of 2 degrees of arc.  To be sure, the amount the glaziers would need to offset the pane of glass will probably be somewhere up to 10-15 degrees towards the worst case, which would be the mid-height of the buiding because all the easy spots of window focus have already been taken (so that not all the windows have to be adjusted). Some windows can be selected to focus where they are, and the others adjusted around that to fill the selected zone.  The top of the building requires very little angular offset to cause the beam to fly out of the focus zone altogether, bcause of the greater distance to the target - like trying to focus a binoculars steadily on a distant site.  The worst thing about the super-focused light now is that it increases dramatically the chances of cataract development and skin cancer, even more than the alarming heat generated.

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